Abatron question
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Mic-Hal



Joined: 14 Dec 2010
Posts: 37
Location: Weirton WV, Cape Cod MA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 5:07 pm    Post subject: Abatron question Reply with quote

Most of my windows seem to be in decent shape from what I can tell but they are still covered in a LOT of old curling paint


before I tackle any of them I want to have some Abitron or other epoxy on hand, the thing is how much to order, as you know it ain't cheap!

So about how much repair area would a Quart kit handle? and since I will be doing these windows one at a time I don't want to overbuy and have wasted product, it says it is good for a year.

any of you that used it please comment, or if you have used other brands you like give me info on those please.
Thanks
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2972
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2012 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get a small amount first, the quart-kit might be good, but you're the one person who could know. You might do more than a visual assessment of your windows. Poke at the lower joints of the sashes, and at the sill joints to see if they are soft and decayed. My book, Save America's Windows, shows how to assess sills and joints for decay:

http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/reports/reports.htm#Windows

I find that the Abatron materials are still good long after the 1 year shelf life recommended by the manufacturer. I am current using from a 3 year old gallon-sized kit, and have used some up to 10 years old. If it is more than 3 years old and I have not used from it for a few months, I always mix a little test to make sure it is good. (it has never been bad)

The "B" part of the consolidant can crystallize and look cloudy if it gets too cold. I put the consolidant container in a bucket of hot water to gently warm it up and the crystals go back into solution and it is ready to use.

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Mic-Hal



Joined: 14 Dec 2010
Posts: 37
Location: Weirton WV, Cape Cod MA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2012 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John,
I have another question about this. I was just thinking, suppose I find that I have minimal damage and perhaps only some amount of weather checking on the outer sills, that sort of thing.
I have been reading where some of the epoxies that have been used over the past ten or more years are starting to fail and basically pop out.

I will be using Glaze-Ease 601 to reglaze my windows, what if I used some of it to fill any checking? Is that a crazy idea? I would not do that on serious damage, but thought perhaps it would work to fill and smooth out minor checking.

Have you ever tested it for that? I know they make a line of epoxy as well, but figured the GE 601 is suppose to adhere well and stay flexible so might work better then the epoxy that has been popping out.
Any thoughts?
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