This old house video on insulating Weight rope pockets
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Mic-Hal



Joined: 14 Dec 2010
Posts: 37
Location: Weirton WV, Cape Cod MA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 5:21 pm    Post subject: This old house video on insulating Weight rope pockets Reply with quote

John have you viewed the Video
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/video/0,,20051453,00.html

I know you like to leave room for air circulation but this method looks to me like you would still have some air movement but not into the house.

I would like your oppinion of the method shown if you would not mind viewing it.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2972
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sure, no problem.

Down side:

Any insulation in the pocket means less air to absorb water from the wood. The "chimney effect of air" he mentions is exactly what you DO want to happen in this space. The movement of air is good in that it helps keep the wood dry.

He says that the insulation is 2" thick. In the video at minute 1:00 to 1:15 you can see that the distance from the interior edge of the jamb board to the edge of the pocket opening is about 7/8". He puts the insulation flush with the edge so the insulation is blocking the pocket opening by about 1 1/8", which you can see at minute 1:15. This will made future changing of the sash cord difficult at best.

Up side:
Sealing from the edge of the jamb boards over to the plaster with aluminum tape is OK, perhaps even good. I wonder how long the adhesive on the tape will last--perhaps several or many years.

The foam rubber trick with the sash cord at the pulley is good. It would be even better to use a folded up piece of cotton cloth, which is biodegradable renewable material instead of the petrol-chemical foam. That looked like open-cell foam so cotton cloth would probable have similar air infiltration characteristics. I guess foam could be OK if it is using foam that will be thrown out, but definitely not buying new for for this purpose.

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