wood gutters - lined with copper?
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eriklpaul



Joined: 03 Sep 2013
Posts: 1
Location: Connecticut

PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2013 5:46 pm    Post subject: wood gutters - lined with copper? Reply with quote

My wife and I are in the process of buying a salt box historic home (1735) in need of gutter replacement in the back of the house and new gutters in the front. (The front has no gutters at all.)

We want to use wood gutters and wonder if they are ever lined on the inside with copper? Just wondering what would be the best visually (wood) and trying to keep maintenance to a minimum.

I would appreciate your opinion on the matter, and if you have any recommended reading would be pleased to know of it.

Thanks for the advice.



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TimB



Joined: 03 Sep 2009
Posts: 43

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I work for an historic house museum in Portland, Maine, with numerous wooden gutters lined with copper (both lead-coated and plain copper). The large gutters on our main cornice were rebuilt in redwood in 1973, lined with copper at that time, and relined about ten years later when then entire roof was redone in copper. The wood gutters on the main cornice are very high, but appear after 40 years to have held up very well. This was confirmed in 2010 when we rented a lift to conduct maintenance on one section of the cornice.

A few details that have likely contributed to the gutter's longevity:
1) the copper liner was formed so as to create an airspace between the liner and both the wooded gutter trough and the lower deck boards of the roof, giving condensation some opportunity to evaporate.
2) small holes were drilled from the gutter trough through to the outside edge of the gutter. This improved ventilation, gave liquid water (should it get beyond the liner) a way out, and provided for the possibility that watchful staff would notice if the roof or liner was leaking. The holes are barely visible unless you are looking for them.
3) the wooden gutter trough was treated with a water-repellent preservative.

If you would like a pdf copy of the very detailed report on this project, please email me at timbrosnihan@gmail.com and I would be glad to share.

Good luck with your wonderful house!

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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2912
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Tim. I think I have not seen the report, and would like to.
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