Mold and Allback Paint
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Victor



Joined: 07 Aug 2010
Posts: 35
Location: Pacific North West

PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2013 11:37 am    Post subject: Mold and Allback Paint Reply with quote

I should have taken a picture before I sanded this wood.

But you still clearly see how bad the mold was/is.

This was a brand new piece of wood from summer of 2011. It started showing signs of black and green growth on it by Spring/Summer time frame of 2012.

The wood in the picture was primed with allback linseed oil. Then thin coats of allback paint, with no zinc additive. Probably a total of four thin coats to achieve a solid color.

On the porch itself, I painted a small section with the allback zinc white as the base coat, then the regular non zinc fortified. It has held up much better, but there is still some very minor molding going on.

From my experience, allback paint mixed with zinc white does not mold. Furthering my belief that the zinc should be added to all their paints, and not require the end user perform that step.



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Victor



Joined: 07 Aug 2010
Posts: 35
Location: Pacific North West

PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 1:41 am    Post subject: Re: Mold and Allback Paint Reply with quote

Victor wrote:


From my experience, allback paint mixed with zinc white does not mold. Furthering my belief that the zinc should be added to all their paints, and not require the end user perform that step.


I'd like to add, it seems items that are painted indoors with the allback paint, such as window sashes, and allowed a satisfactory time to cure seem to perform very well, than if something is painted outside.

My hypothesis is when the temperatures drop in the late evening, and early morning moisture condenses on the paint and weakens it.

Dew condensation does not happen in heated indoor environments.

So in addition to zinc being added to the paint, other driers are probably needed as well to speed up how fast the paint cures.
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los angeles



Joined: 28 Mar 2012
Posts: 13
Location: Los Angeles

PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2014 12:53 pm    Post subject: Allback paint, mildew, zinc white additive Reply with quote

Adding about 5-10% zinc white has worked for me. It is now about 10 months since I painted columns, pergola beams, window & doors screens, and some wood trim. No mildew problems on those items.

My siding was painted without zinc white added, and there are mildew problems. Tellingly, there is no mildew in 1/4 to 1/2 inch circles around the galvanized siding nails. Zinc leaching from the nails.

And I was just checking the Solvent Free Paint website. They have a new mildew advisory posted. Their new statement is an instruction to always add zinc white:

"Always add 10-20% of the zinc white to any exterior surface."

Part of me is a bit miffed about the cost of remediation I must shoulder. Part of me is happy that the linseed oil paint can work well as a system if zinc white is added.
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nbogosian



Joined: 09 Mar 2014
Posts: 14
Location: texas

PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:12 am    Post subject: zinc white Reply with quote

adding the zinc white seems ideal....i wonder, though, about reports of zinc white making paint crack over time. perhaps this is more a problem with pure zinc white as opposed to being just an additive.
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SD26



Joined: 10 Jan 2016
Posts: 1
Location: Burlington, WI

PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2016 9:08 am    Post subject: Re: Allback paint, mildew, zinc white additive Reply with quote

los angeles wrote:

"Always add 10-20% of the zinc white to any exterior surface."

Part of me is a bit miffed about the cost of remediation I must shoulder. Part of me is happy that the linseed oil paint can work well as a system if zinc white is added.


I "found" Allback paint on the internet recently. Sounds good, but I've been expecting to find some drawbacks. I guess here it is.

Adding zinc white to their linseed oil paint would change the color a little, correct?

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Dave - WI
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