Parting Bead and
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Muffin



Joined: 28 Jul 2006
Posts: 11
Location: Nashua, NH

PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 10:29 am    Post subject: Parting Bead and Reply with quote

I have to replace some of my parting beads as they snapped as I removed them or were unusable. I read somewhere to use spanish cedar parting beads for my double hung windows.

1. Does anyone have an opinion as to the best kind of wood for parting bead?

2. If the sashes are painted, do you recommend painting the parting bead also? If yes, does it need the full priming and painting regimen?

3. Where is a good source for parting bead?

4. Does the lower area of the jam which the upper, outer sash slides down into when opening, get re-painted or is it best to stain it to protect it? (My outer trim and sill is painted the same color as the outside of my sashes.)

Thank you!
Martin
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jade



Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 786
Location: Hawley MA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi martin.....
my opinions are:

1) best' wood is straight grained mahogany...that being said, straight grained pine, cedar, oak and others will work as well........

2) any part of the window that is subject to friction by a sliding component should be oiled or stained and oiled--not painted. penetro,l made by the 'flood' company, is an excellent product. if you use mahogany, it has a dark rich color that will be enchanced by the penetrol thereby eliminating the need for stain. use a mix of 1/2 penetrol and 1/2 thinner so the mixture will soak into the wood. since mahogany is rather dense, two coats should be sufficient...

3) contact a local woodworker or mill...lumber and hardware stores typically carry deck grade mahogany which will not be sufficient for parting bead--it will bend and warm like a sliver ripped from pine.....be prepared to pay a pretty penny if your resource does not stock your size parting bead--upwards of $5-plus per linneal foot!

4) see #2!! often the lower section of the jamb is painted to match the exterior trim color....one coat of primer and two coats of finishpaint shouldn't restrict movement but, down the road the build-up will cause problems...i often consider the next person who will be working on the project after i am long gone....i have used every swear word in the book trying to get a heavy top sash out of the jamb only to discover that they had been nailed in by some &%$*# dope many years ago....

good luck....
...jade
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Muffin



Joined: 28 Jul 2006
Posts: 11
Location: Nashua, NH

PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 12:33 pm    Post subject: Penetrol Reply with quote

Hi Jade,

Thanks very much for your reply. So is Penetrol an oil application for movement, or is it a stain? Sorry. Just trying to clarify.

Assuming the Penetrol is used on moving parts, I should also apply that to the unfinished edges of the sash, the inside of the frames where the sash slide, and the parting bead?

Can I find Penetrol at Aubechon Hardware or Home Depot?

Again, thank you!
Martin
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jade



Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 786
Location: Hawley MA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey martin.....

penetrol, as its name implies, is a penetrating oil that istypically added to oil paint to enhance brush application...it can be used on any wood surface--so all of the surfaces of the window that you mentioned...remember to cut it with mineral spirits or turpentine...it is not a stain but does darken the wood when applied....use a bristle brush rather than a foam brush...let dry as per the instructions on the can...a fan blowing on the oiled wood will help it oxidize and dry faster (a fan will also help dry your glazing putty faster as well)....it is available at most hardware or paint stores....what is home depot? haha....i don't shop there....

as an aside.....at one time boiled linseed oil was THE oil to use for penetrating and conditioning wood....today's blo has added synthetic ingredients and attracts mold...there are other products out there but penetrol is the most widely available and used alkyd resin product...

best.....
....jade
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Muffin



Joined: 28 Jul 2006
Posts: 11
Location: Nashua, NH

PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 10:03 am    Post subject: Penetrol Reply with quote

Thanks Jade,

Yes I try to avoid Home Depot whenever possible as most things are carried in the local hardware store which I prefer to try to keep around. I'll run down there today and look for the Penetrol. And yes the fan works... I have one hanging from bungee cords in my (dehumidified) basement pointed towards four sash hanging on my rack that have just been glazed and another four in various stages of painting :) The fan cuts down the putty 'curing' time dramatically.

All the best,
Martin
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