waste water
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dereklogan



Joined: 08 Feb 2013
Posts: 1
Location: portland maine

PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 4:19 pm    Post subject: waste water Reply with quote

I've just purchased a historic home in Portland and am currently researching the proper methods of repairing and and maintaining this beautiful 130 year old structure. I'm loving reading through your website and forum and watching your demonstration videos. However, I'm not seeing any information on how to deal with the lead containing waste water generated by everything from general cleanup to specific tasks like cleaning panes when rehabbing a window. I assume you can't just dump it down the drain?

Thanks!
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2940
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Derek, welcome to the Forum.

Here in Portland, for homeowners doing their own work, I believe the proper disposal of water that contains lead from cleanup is, in fact, to pour it down the drain. All of the sewage is treated for lead at the waste treatment plant by Tukey's Bridge. So, if your house is served by the city sewage system, you just dump it down the drain. Solid waste containing lead should go in sealed plastic bags and taken to the city's solid waste management site on Riverside St.

Proper disposal may be different on projects where the work is done by tradespeople or contractors who are paid to do it.

Check to get the latest word on this by calling City Hall at the main number and they will route your call to the right department. Or try, Maine Department of Environmental Protection office, Portland (207)822-6300. Let us know if it is any different than above.

Read, understand and follow the Lead-Safe work practices described in the publication: "Lead Paint Safety, a field guide for painting, home maintenance and renovation work." Download it at:
http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/education/WindowsHandouts/leadsafetybk.pdf

I hope you brought your snow shovel with you when you moved in! Over here in Deering Neighborhood the snow is up to the window sills.

And, Welcome to Portland!

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
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jbmnd93



Joined: 15 Jul 2010
Posts: 53

PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I work with the top of the line repointer here in DC. Although the city places no requirements on how he disposes of his waste water from paint removal jobs, he's trying to develop a process that he thinks there's a market for.

He hasn't figured out the setup yet, but he's trying to configure a chelation process. I was terrible at chemistry. Chelation would work if you could ramp it up to the right scale. Chelation is basically the combination of elements or compounds with metals to form new compounds that makes the metal inert. Chelation is the process used in medicine to treat lead poisoning.

Wiki gives Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, widely abbreviated as EDTA, as a type of carbolic acid that chelates with lead in medical procedures and as an industrial method of sequestering metal ions.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2940
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the difficulties of processing special waste or hazardous waste is that it usually opens up another more complex and costly level of regulations and laws that have to be followed by the processor.
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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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BenS



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 9
Location: Victoria, British Columbia

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have recently run into a lack of clarity in the lead paint disposal rules in my community (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada).

I want to bring bagged scrapings (i.e. pure paint) to the dump as hazardous waste. The dump says I need to send them results from a lab test. However, there is a $30 test that says "you have lead" (or not) and then a $200 test that determines the leachability of the lead, which is relevant because once buried in the landfill it may be in contact with ground water.

Of course, the local dump cannot take anything with a lead content leachibility level of something like 95ppm (I may have gotten the number or metric wrong). So I cannot just get the $30 test.

Additionally, when I expressed my frustration at how hard it was to do the "right thing", the dump told me that their suggestion was to bring an entire piece of painted wood, rather than just the scrapings, for testing. That would decrease the overall percentage of lead in the sample, bringing it within acceptable levels. Of course, this is basically lying about what I'm throwing away.

The "proper" solution would be to use the services of a haz mat remediation company, which could be hundreds of dollars to throw away a few bags of lead scrapings. Does anyone here have a similar experience or work in areas with different regulations on lead paint disposal?
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