Problems (& Solutions) with Allback linseed paint
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Skuce



Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 188
Location: Ontario Canada

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saskatchewan and Manitoba are huge Flax producers up here.

I give Allback paint a big thumbs UP. Positive feedback for sure. It just takes education for the system to work...like ALL coating systems.

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Drew Skuce
PSC Heritage Restoration
5-48 Woodslee Ave. Paris, Ont. Canada
www.ParadigmShiftCustoms.com
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Don Wagstaff



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 100

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

Well, speaking of flax production may I off er the following reference

https://vimeo.com/52320031

Greetings,

Don Wagstaff
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los angeles



Joined: 28 Mar 2012
Posts: 13
Location: Los Angeles

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 8:38 pm    Post subject: treating mildew on Allback paint Reply with quote

I've read the thread on mildew problems & Allback paints. Any advice on what to do after an Allback paint job has developed mildew problems?

My 100 year old house was painted winter-spring 2012 after being stripped down to its cedar siding by heat gun. A lot of siding was replaced. The mildew problem is concentrated in some areas of the old siding, especially on some siding that was removed and left exposed through winter rains (grrr), but it is not limited to those areas. Zinc white was not added to the paint. Los Angeles has a dry summer and only 15-20 inches of rain in the winter, but fall-spring there is nighttime humidity from the ocean.

I am on my own for the cure. The contractor is out of the picture. Long story.

Would treating with a 25% bleach solution followed by a coat of boiled linseed oil with 5-10% zinc oxide mixed in be successful? Would a new coat of paint with 5% zinc oxide be better?

Any alternatives to bleach? I understand that Allback touts their soap with (I think) glycol added, but does it work?

I am hoping not to have to strip down the wood again.
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johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2961
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One effective way to solve problems like this is to do a side-by-side comparison, testing out three or four different methods and materials. I usually make the test panels 3' x 3', but sometimes 1' x 1' is adequate. Keep good notes (written, photos, video, etc.) of the step-by-step procedures and materials you use in in panel. Then let the panels age. Over time it will become apparent which methods and materials work better than others.

The reason to keep good notes is so that you can re-create the method that has proven to work the best.

It is worth doing this testing for yourself, because there are probably key causes that are specific to your situation.

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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los angeles



Joined: 28 Mar 2012
Posts: 13
Location: Los Angeles

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John - Thank you. A scientific approach to testing is always a good idea.

I'm curious to see if anyone on the board has tried the Allback soap plus as an alternative to bleach, and if anyone has experience with bleach solutions going onto the Allback paint.

Also curious to see whether anyone has used zinc oxide (whether diluted in oil or in Allback paint) as a coat on top of fairly fresh (1 year old) Allback paint afflicted with mildew.

Once I have collected all the wisdom out there I will start the experiments and report back over time.

I'll also call the paint vendor (Viking) too, but I want to gather maximum information from other sources first.
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Victor



Joined: 07 Aug 2010
Posts: 35
Location: Pacific North West

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

johnleeke wrote:
Victor, just to confirm, in your test Windowsill # 1, did you use the Allback Zinc White alone as the paint?

And, did you do a test using the Allback Zinc White mixed with Allback Linseed Oil paint per their instructions?


The first question, that is correct. Zinc oxide alone.

Second question, I've restored and painted two more windows around October last year. And mixed the zinc white in with the paint, and so far everything is holding up.

It'd be nice to buy the Allback paint premixed with the zinc oxide.
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los angeles



Joined: 28 Mar 2012
Posts: 13
Location: Los Angeles

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Victor wrote:
johnleeke wrote:
Victor, just to confirm, in your test Windowsill # 1, did you use the Allback Zinc White alone as the paint?

And, did you do a test using the Allback Zinc White mixed with Allback Linseed Oil paint per their instructions?


The first question, that is correct. Zinc oxide alone.

Second question, I've restored and painted two more windows around October last year. And mixed the zinc white in with the paint, and so far everything is holding up.

It'd be nice to buy the Allback paint premixed with the zinc oxide.

---------------


Hi Victor

Would you please clarify a little more: The two windows you restored and painted in October 2012, were they windows 7 and 8, or did you go back to some of the windows that had mildew/mld on them? If they had mildew/mold, what prep did you do before repainting?

Thank you
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Victor



Joined: 07 Aug 2010
Posts: 35
Location: Pacific North West

PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

los angeles wrote:
Victor wrote:
johnleeke wrote:
Victor, just to confirm, in your test Windowsill # 1, did you use the Allback Zinc White alone as the paint?

And, did you do a test using the Allback Zinc White mixed with Allback Linseed Oil paint per their instructions?


The first question, that is correct. Zinc oxide alone.

Second question, I've restored and painted two more windows around October last year. And mixed the zinc white in with the paint, and so far everything is holding up.

It'd be nice to buy the Allback paint premixed with the zinc oxide.

---------------


Hi Victor

Would you please clarify a little more: The two windows you restored and painted in October 2012, were they windows 7 and 8, or did you go back to some of the windows that had mildew/mld on them? If they had mildew/mold, what prep did you do before repainting?

Thank you


They were the windows housed in window sills 5 and 6, and windows that I had not done anything with yet. To further clarify, I have not redone any work except what is explained below with repainting these window sills:

Window sills and remainder of the frames and trim were infrared heat stripped.

Sanded smooth with 60 grit.

Two or three coats of raw linseed oil.

Sealed with 2 coats of a clear penetrating wood epoxy resin. (Dr. Wood Rot).

Two coats oil primer, and two coats latex paint.

The windows were completely stripped with infrared heat and sanded smooth with 60 grit. Raw linseed oiled, and then sealed with the wood epoxy resin. Two coats again.

Then four coats of Allback linseed oil paint w/zinc white added.

Western exposure. They get soaking pretty soaking wet when its rainy and windy here. But are holding up well.

I'm wondering if using the clear penetrating epoxy if the primer is overkill, especially two coats of it.
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Oldschool



Joined: 05 Jan 2019
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 4:48 pm    Post subject: Updates in 2019 ? Reply with quote

Hello everyone I am a newbie who is looking for the most optimal paint for an old sash and was wondering if there have been any updates on lindseed oil paints ?

Seems like Viking products already come with Zinc added and based on old posts, Allback with Zinc added solve the mildew problem ?

Is this still considered the paint of choice for old sash ? If not, are there any suggestions ?

Thank you

SJ
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johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2961
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2019 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Allback paint and putty is enough different than the American made paints that it requires special attention, knowledge and skills that are not easily acquired.
I am still testing the Allback paints and putty, but not recommending them for anything other than testing.

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John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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