Allback linseed oil paint & putty
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3009
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Allbacks linseed paint is designed as a sacrifical layer. The linseed oil oxidises over time releasing the pigments individually


Hurray!!!

Now we can get back to the good old days of effective paint performance.

If you are wondering why I am excited please take a look at this:

http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/qa/qa07.htm

Linseed oil paint solves the two main causes of paint failure over the past 60 years. The two causes:

1. Heavy paint buildup

2. Weak attachment to the substrate

and brings us back to a rational maintenance strategy, rather than the American paint industry's marketing hype, which is to keep slapping on more and more coats of paint, which contributes to heavy paint buildup and failure by peeling.

WooHOOOOOO !!!!

EnglishDaughter, Soren, Hans, Sonja, we really must see some detailed photos of this showing what weathering does to the paint condition 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 years out. Also, some showing the maintenance proceedures, step by step. Video would be good. Can you upload some here, or send them to me at johnleeke@historichomeworks.com

Or, send me some actual aged samples, I'll photograph them, shoot some video analyzing them and then return them to you.

Giddyup!

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EnglishDaughter, you might take a look at this discussion:

http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=5199#5199

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John

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englishdaughter



Joined: 23 Jun 2009
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 9:59 am    Post subject: Another post! Reply with quote

Hi John,

I've picked that one up and responded - if anyone else is having filling questions or yellowing problems they ought to also have a look at it too!

If anyone needs further help just let me know!! I am now watching both threads!!

E D (why, oh why did I use such a long username??!!!)
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freedomdepartment



Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So now that a few years have passed since this thread was started, do any of you who have tested/used the Allback linseed oil paint have any comments as to its longevity? How did it hold up to rain, sun exposure, etc.?

Also, for woods which are prone to swelling/warping/checking/splitting/etc. unless kept dry (i.e. flat-sawn southern yellow pine), how did you find that the wood held up as the paint wore thin over time?

Would you use this paint on foot-traffic areas, such as porches, porch staircases, kitchen/bathroom floors, etc.?

Do you feel that there is a better alkyd/oil-based paint on the market?

Thanks!
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freedomdepartment



Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Nevermind" on that last post of mine. After reading another thread on here, complete with photos, about how the Allback paint is very inconsistent, and often suffers from extreme mold/mildew problems, I've decided firmly against it. I'll just go back to making my own lead paint (no comments from the anti-lead peanut gallery, please). Lasts decades, self-cleaning, no mold/mildew problems, and tough as stone. Just can't beat an old-fashioned oil-based enamel paint that contains lead and turpentine!

Thanks anyhow!
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Skuce



Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 188
Location: Ontario Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just been adding a small amount of Zinc Oxide to my Allbacks paints. Just to make it toxic to the molds and mildews out there. More for the fact of stopping any "edible" contaminates in the surface from affecting the anti-mildew properties of the Allbacks Paint.

I have a great long term example in my back yard of how effective Zinc is as a fungicide.
I have a basketball hoop in the backyard that has been there for a good 20 years now. It's in a very shady location now (trees grew up around it) and is covered in black and green mildew.
Except...the locations where the the 2 main Zinc plated bolts go through, and the corresponding drip lines off these bolts. Clean as the day the backboard was put up.

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Drew Skuce
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5-48 Woodslee Ave. Paris, Ont. Canada
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Skuce



Joined: 08 Nov 2009
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Location: Ontario Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only issue I have had with Allbacks paints is sheen consistency. Most notably was the "brick red". I would get semi-gloss and flat patches though all of the coats.
So what I would do is for the final coat....just rag on a super thin layer of regular BLO and the sheen would even right out.

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Keon



Joined: 14 Nov 2019
Posts: 8
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2020 11:26 am    Post subject: Re: use of Allbacks products in UK Reply with quote

I know this is an older post but setting the figures straight won't harm...
englishdaughter wrote:
Hi,
I understand that some of you are wanting more information about the Allbacks paint from the UK as it has been used there the longer than in the US. I have been actively using this paint from inception in the UK (2001) and wrote the english instructions. If anyone has any questions i would be more than happy to assist...

A few basic bits of information for you all:

1. Most linseed oil is unsuitable for use on timber due to it containing a high level of proteins and nutrients that encourage mould and fungal growth. Allbacks linseed oil both raw and boiled are cold pressed and refined to remove these impurities.

Recent scientific research has proven that the main culprit for fungal growth is uncured (linseed) oil. Certain fungi (yeasts) can eat the triglycerides in vegetable oils.

englishdaughter wrote:

2. Initially only one coat of oil should be applied to the timber and that should be raw linseed oil which you have first warmed to 60degrees C. This is thinner than boiled linseed oil and will consequently penetrate the timbers further giving better long term protection.

The use of raw oil has to be avoided! And if more for the first coat on wood as the deeper the oil penetrates, the harder it is to cure. Heating the oil to about 60°C/140°F will speed up the curing process a little bit (but not enough) and will kill some fungi (spores) but it is hard to keep that temperature up while applying it.
If you want to protect the wood from water ingress, I think it is better to use pine tar diluted with some gum turpentine but without linseed oil, not even boiled linseed oil. If you know that one of those fungi that can digest triglycerides is the yeast that causes blue stain and we know that blue stain can go quite deep into the wood, you don't want any uncured oil hanging around there... So it is better to avoid vegetable oils (deep) below the wood surface.
Linseed oil/paint should only be used for the final coats and the penetration into the wood is not a major concern (for that we used pine tar). It doesn't need to penetrate other then for bonding with the upper wood fibers.

englishdaughter wrote:

3. It is necessary to apply a minimum of three coats of paint.

Be aware that each coat will reduce the vapor permeability of your finish! If you take into account the first layer (primer) the total is 4... That's a lot. Cured linseed oil is far less vapor open than generally assumed (nothing beats lime-casein paints on that matter).
More coats of paint will reduce water ingress but it will also reduce the drying capacity of the wood... it's a trade off.

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Koenraad
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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2020 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Keon, thanks for the excellent update. Is this based on research, or your own personal experience using these materials?
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Keon



Joined: 14 Nov 2019
Posts: 8
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2020 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have posted more details about the scientific research here (click) in the 'Paints & Finishes'-section together with my personal experiments.

I built a shed (mostly in plywood) and I used Lineco paint (based on BLO) from Uula (Finland) which I diluted with raw linseed oil from Ottosson (Sweden). I did a lot of (internet) reading three years ago before applying linseed oil paint but ended with a lot of mildew anyway...

A few months ago I decided to wash everything clean with soda (Sodium carbonate) and to my surprise I was able to wash off the paint almost completely. At the areas with the most mildew, the paint came loose as first. The patches which I painted undiluted were free from mildew and didn't came loose by the soda wash.
My conclusion is that the raw linseed oil underneath the surface was still not cured... after more then two years (!).

I did a new internet search regarding mildew, mold and fungi growth related to linseed oil and came across the scientific research which states that fungi (yeasts) grow on/in uncured vegetable oil... which explains the situation on my shed.

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