Pine Tar for wood roof shingles?
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wmbmac



Joined: 05 Jun 2012
Posts: 1
Location: Northeast

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:42 pm    Post subject: Pine Tar for wood roof shingles? Reply with quote

Has anyone out there used Pine Tar as a preservative for wood roof shingles?
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Don Wagstaff



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 100

PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

No, but I'm getting ready to just as soon as I've got the shingling done. I've got my mixture out there under the stairs. It's not strictly pine tar though. Oh there's pine tar in there but the mixture coming out of the Sweden Finland area sometimes referred to as roslag is 1/3 pine tar, 1/3 linseed oil and 1/3 pine turpentine though I plan omitting the turpentine - that's the stuff distilled off the pine tar not the petroleum by product - and putting the stuff on warm with a fire down there keeping it up to temperature.

Not a maintenance free procedure by any means. I plan on re coating every two to three years based on passed experience.

Greetings,

Don Wagstaff
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catfeesh



Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2019 8:49 am    Post subject: Pine tar and linseed wood treatment Reply with quote

Sorry to dredge up an old post, but has anyone seen Mr. Wagstaff around online? It's been awhile, but I'd love to hear how his experiments with pine tar and linseed oil worked out. I'm contemplating a similar approach for my cedar clapboard cabin.
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Keon



Joined: 14 Nov 2019
Posts: 8
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2020 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It worked for the Viking churches in the middle ages ;-)

There are modern examples of colored pine tar as well... see: https://www.raitums.lv/

If you care for black stains/mildew, don't use raw linseed oil and do use gum turpentine to dilute the tar.

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Koenraad
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catfeesh



Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2020 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the tips Keon. I'll test out some different products and recipes on my outbuildings and see what works best. I'd like to know long a pine tar, linseed oil and pigment based exterior based finish might last outdoors... I'm a little concerned about the frequency of reapplication and ongoing cost.

Cheers
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Keon



Joined: 14 Nov 2019
Posts: 8
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wel, based on my knowledge and experience (so far), see:

... I would propose the following, all based on natural products:

First, protect the wood with a preservative
In Europe and Canada, you can get something called Wood Bliss which is a preservative made from pure natural materials.
As a bonus, it will also enhance the fire resistance of the wood.

Experimental alternative: "wash" the wood with hydraulic lime (Calcium Hydroxide) without rinsing (as it dries, you will directly see the spots you missed :-)). This lime wash will desinfect the wood from all kind of fungi spores (it's also used in chicken rens as a desinfactant).
Wear glasses and rubber gloves as hydraulic lime is caustic!

Second, fill the wood with some greasy stuff to protect it from water absorption.
And for this I would NOT use a drying oil like Linseed or Tung oil (be it boiled or raw) because as long as it's uncured, it will act as fungi-food. And for the oil "deep" below the surface, the curing time is unpredictable... might take months or years... if it ever cures at all.

Proven material for this is Pine Tar, diluted with gum turpentine at your own insight for workability. Some heat up the pine tar but that's a safety risk, certainly if you are working above ground level.

Experimental alternative: Coconut Oil. This oil has some natural anti-fungal properties. Only drawback: it's solid at room temperature, so it's best applied during the summer or heated. But it can also be diluted with gum turpentine.

Third, finish it off with a top coat.
This topcoat will give the wood - and the greasy stuff inside it - some UV-protection while also providing extra water protection (and the color of your choice).
For this top coat, linseed and/or tung oil based paint is ideal, again, don't use any raw oils but only pre polymerized ones (boiled, aired, ...). Dilute it with gum turpentine at your own insights. Multiple thin coats are better then fewer thick coats... Provide 3 days drying time in between the coats.


Normally, this should result in something that will only need some extra wax or clear boiled oil after 5 to 7 years. After that, it should be maintenance free for the next 10years.

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Koenraad


Last edited by Keon on Thu Jan 16, 2020 5:57 pm; edited 1 time in total
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catfeesh



Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, thanks Keon... very interesting stuff.
Lime wash and coconut oil are new to me.
I will have to give it some thought.
I may just let my wood be wood in the end...
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