Problems (& Solutions) with Allback linseed paint
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catfeesh



Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cabinfeverarts wrote:
2016 was the application of Allback's premixed white with zinc. I noticed failure 2018..peeling at the bottom of the trim and mold anyway regardless of the premixed zinc. I have on the very same porch Allback white with no zinc from 2010ish with no peeling. But there is a difference. The white from back in 2010 was placed on old growth pine window trim onsite, pre-treated with Allback linseed soap extra (their former borate solution). The 2016 white premixed with zinc was on new oak trim painted offsite indoors and installed as door trim (so about 5 inches off the ground, not waist level or above like the window trim). So technically it could be a location or new wood issue, but I still just don't trust the premixed zinc since it just behaved so peely-like so fast. And with literature like this saying zinc makes paints become brittle, I don't even want to risk it. https://www.naturalpigments.com/artist-materials/zinc-white-oil-paint-color/

After posting in August, I did go ahead and made my own paint from linseed oil. It turns out Allback does make a zinc free white, but Viking has stopped supplying Allback paints in favor of Ottoson paints with premixed zinc in them. Viking has told me that Ottoson has "the right" amount of zinc mixed in and they are now only selling off their old Allback stock. "The right" amount is only playing a have faith in us game which I'm not volunteering to play. I could just get the Allback white without zinc from the next closest distributor (Canada), but I would have to pay extra shipping costs. So I chose to try making my own paint.

When I made my own paint, I first used Allback raw linseed oil and titanium oxide. It was as simple as stirring the two together. I wondered if I need to "mull" the paint, but I didn't. Seemed fine. Since I only had raw oil on hand at first, it did take "forever" to set, but it did eventually set. Since it was autumn, I had to finish my project fast, so I converted to boiled oil so it would set faster between coats. I am curious about trying the raw mixture again when I have much more time. All the theory says the raw is better, you just have to have the time. I wonder if I have a storm window off the house anyway in spring and only want to install in October, would at least the first coat of raw white paint be any different from the technique of using a base raw clear oil? And white takes so many coats to build up to a solid color, why not start the pre-treatment with some pigment?

I think in the long run mixing my own colors is smarter. I can always record my ratios and make the same colors decades later. This is going to be my issue with the Allback Brick Red which I have already used. Now that Viking will no longer supply it, I am going to have to figure out with pigments how to make a "brick red" to match what I already have on the house. But once I have my own recipe, I can always remake it in the future and not be at the mercy of any specific manufacturer or retailer who could easily go out of business at anytime.


This is a little anecdotal,. but if you're looking for a diy red paint...
I ran a little experiment with flax oil plus a number of different pigments about ten years ago. I left my "experiment" outdoors...the nicest looking and longest lasting sample was the one containing red chalk line powder (iron oxide). Slate dust also did well.
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cabinfeverarts



Joined: 05 Aug 2008
Posts: 116

PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2020 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks so much for the info about boiled versus raw linseed oil. I now mixed BLO and an oxide pigment. Why not just skip adding a solvent (like turpentine)? Is the only downside that it doesn't spread as well and will require more product to cover a large area?
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catfeesh



Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2020 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's my understanding of it. I remember reading that turpentine was a relatively larger molecule and did not improve the penetration of linseed oil...which seems to be poor. I have my doubts after having looked at the chemical formulas for the two.
Turpentine may accelerate polymerization of the oil? I assume it also has some anti-microbial effects.
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