Steam Paint Removal (with video)
Post new topic   Reply to topic
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Paints & Finishes Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
TideWater



Joined: 03 Aug 2014
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 8:14 pm    Post subject: Is the steam removal method practical for a ceiling? Reply with quote

I'm thinking of taking the plunge into using a steamer to strip paint but I haven't seen anyone mention doing it on a ceiling so I wanted to check first. I need to strip and repaint the beadboard ceiling of an outdoor porch. It's probably about 8'x20'. The paint is thick and alligatored. Some of it comes off easily with a scraper but it still takes me a while to get a patch to the stage where all the paint is either removed or so firmly attached that it's safe to leave.

Would it steaming work on something like this? And is there anything special I should be aware of for doing it overhead? (I have John's restoration report).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2992
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It seems likely to work on that heavy buildup.
Do not scrape off the loose paint before you apply steam, for two reasons:

-- The old paint will protect the wood from absorbing excessive water. If you are steaming a surface with spots that have no paint the wood will become soft and it will be difficult to scrape off the adjacent paint without damaging the soft wood.

-- The steam is a damp process, so it will help mitigate the lead risks. Might as well take advantage of this, rather than scraping dry before steaming, which would increase the lead risks.

take care, work safe, and keep us posted on your progress

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2992
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>I should be aware of for doing it overhead?<<

Don't let the hot condensation water drip down onto you.

If you don't routinely work overhead, do some exercises to get your body used to it, and do just a small area every other day for a week, then slowly increase the size of the area each day.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
BenS



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 18
Location: Victoria, British Columbia

PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2020 9:03 pm    Post subject: Removal of paint from stucco Reply with quote

I’ve got a 1916 stucco-clad house on the west coast of Canada with failing oil paint. It looks like it was painted Over with latex paint which started it peeling.

I’d like to remove it all and hot lime wash it. However, I am finding complete removal difficult and probably not worth my time. Some larger sections of the paint have come off with power washing.

The photo is from a sample corner with the flaking paint removed. The green and grey are the underlying stucco/first coat of paint.
I am unsure if the stucco is OPC or lime based. It may not be original but was done at a time when wood lath was used in British Columbia, Canada.

I’ve been told that steam removal would be effective but I am wondering if anyone here can describe the process on stucco. As it is a comparatively large surface area, I will not put as much time and effort as I do in to stripping paint from the wood trim. With that in mind, I am looking to estimate the time required get a reasonable percentage of the paint removed.

Also, for anyone familiar with limewash:
If I were to place a coat of hot lime wash over all the wall (with and without oil paint still on it) how well or poorly should I expect it to perform and look?



85822B23-F076-493A-B9BC-3E856B9410C9.jpeg
 Description:
 Filesize:  146.98 KB
 Viewed:  23 Time(s)

85822B23-F076-493A-B9BC-3E856B9410C9.jpeg



BE26EEFB-5DB4-40A8-A339-06172E5BBCD2.jpeg
 Description:
 Filesize:  150.88 KB
 Viewed:  24 Time(s)

BE26EEFB-5DB4-40A8-A339-06172E5BBCD2.jpeg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2992
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OPC?

All of my experience with steam removal is from wood. The steam warms and softens the paint so it is more easily scraped off. The soft paint is not blasted off by the steam, it must be scraped. Scraping would not work on your highly textured surface.
It could be worth testing steam on your textured stucco. After warming it up to soften it, you could scrub it with a stiff bristle brush. I can imagine the brush would get clogged up with the removed paint.
Steam blasting, where the steam comes out of a nozzle with some force, might be worth testing, but that sort of steam generation equipment is far more hazardous to operate, an I have no experience with it.

It's possible that an effective way to deal with your stucco surface is to simple let the paint weather off. Every 3 or 5 or 10 years, scrub the surface with a vacuum brush to remove and collect the loose paint. Eventually most or all of the paint might weather off. This could be suitable if the stucco is is good condition and will keep the weather out of the walls without paint.

Do keep us posted on your progress.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
BenS



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 18
Location: Victoria, British Columbia

PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2020 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OPC= Ordinary Portland Cement

I like the idea of letting it flake off. I suppose what I’d like in the interim is an aesthetically pleasing one coloured stucco surface—at least one colour from a distance.

I’ll give steam and a brush a shot and post my results here.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Paints & Finishes Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 
Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 7 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum