Swedish Glazing Pin-Rods and Triangular Hammer
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2008 9:33 am    Post subject: Swedish Glazing Pin-Rods and Triangular Hammer Reply with quote

Hans Allback showed me how to use the Swedish pin method three years ago at the Chicago conference and I've been using it since then. Soren handed me a bunch of the "pin-rods" the next year at the Boston conference. It takes about half the point-setting time over any other hand-set method, mainly because you don't have to pick up each individual point, and you can drive the pins right through the muntin rib and hold two panes with one pin for 40% fewer points in some multi-light sash!

The hammer shown at Soren's website looks like an ordinary tack hammer with a rectangular face,


Source: http://www.solventfreepaint.com/accessories.htm#glazingpins

which does work with the pins, but as I recall it is not like the one Hans used, which had a triangular face. I have this same hammer. It has a triangular face that rotates so one side of the hammer face is always flat on the glass, no matter what angle you hold the hammer handle.

This makes it much easier and quicker to drive in the pin with less hammer aiming. A couple of my window trainees said they found the traigle-face hammers at Lee Valley (of course):


http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=51854&cat=1,43293

When I show this method in training sessions and workshops the comment is always how costly the pin-rods are. Well, I have not run the numbers but with saving half the point setting labor I'm confident that if time is money the higher cost is saved on the first sash or two in a run.

The huge advantage is with with very narrow glazing dado shoulders, the pins can simply be driven in on an angle or bent over so they are not in the way of narrow putty tooling.

I think I shot some video of Hans glazing at that Chicago conference, I'll see if I caught his pin method in the video.

Of course, point drivers are still faster, but for hand setting the Swedish pin-rod method can't be beat.

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John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:28 am; edited 2 times in total
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jlindtner



Joined: 10 Sep 2007
Posts: 24
Location: Wilmington, DE

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm curious how many people have switched to this system. Also, I'm wondering about getting scratches on glass with the hammer. I typically would think that glass and hammers don't mix. In some of the windows I've restored, I've seen small cut nails used instead of points. How and why in the mid 1800s when glass was still expensive and more fragile cut nails were used is a concept that boggles my mind and makes me uncomfortable just thinking about.

The pin system does seem like a time saver and I am willing to try something new.

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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You use small nails (aka "sprigs")when you don't have anything else. I've don e it myself.

No problem with scratching glass with steel. Glass is harder than the steel in hammers.

No problems with breaking glass. Glass gets broken only when there is force perpendicular toward the plane of the glass. With the hammer you just rest it gently on the glass, then slide it along the glass (parallel to the plane of the glass) toward the pin or nail. It all works quite nicely. (unless you drop the hammer on the glass--another reason to work the sash vertically on a sash easel, then the hammer lands on your foot.)

Quote:
I'm curious how many people have switched to this system.


I have not switched to pins exclusively. In fact, I use a variety of point systems depending on the situation, each has advantages and disadvantages. I probably use the Fletcher #5 point driver the most because it takes the least time. That gives me the time to slow down and set points or pins carefully by hand when necessary.

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John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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