Glazing color tint
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chopsieze



Joined: 08 Sep 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:34 pm    Post subject: Glazing color tint Reply with quote

Hi! This forum has been a great resource for me... thanks John! I have a question about trying to tint my glazing, I can't figure out what or where to get this "dry pigment" I've read about. I almost attempted mixing some oil stain but didn't know if that would affect the putty to the point it didn't do it's job.

I'm going to call an art store tomorrow and see if they have anything but so far no luck.

If someone can expand a little on this subject I will be very grateful. Thanks!
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2961
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You want dry color pigments. An art store should have it.

Colored chalk can be used. One time the little kids were playing with those fat sticks of chalk drawing on the sidewalk, so we used that, scraping or sanding the chalk sticks into dust with our pocket knives or sandpaper. Worked great, cheaper than artist's color pigments.

Oil-based paint could be added to oil-based putty. Paint would be better than stain because there is more pigment in it. But, the other stuff in the paint may change the way the putty cures and how long it lasts--I'd use it in a pinch.

Spread your putty out flat, sprinkle on just a little, then kneed the putty a lot, the more you kneed it the darker it gets, add in a little more if needed.

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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chopsieze



Joined: 08 Sep 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks! We have a bunch of that big chalk around :), I'll see if there is any brown.
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sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 569
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've used artist oil paints. The type in a tube. I've also use dry , but was concerned about drying out the putty or causing the putty to dry out quicker.

I liked the deeper color I acheived by using the tube paint. A bit messy though.

I decided that applying paint to cover and protect it is the best though. And the putty makers recommend painting over it.

Steve S
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sometimes I add color to the putty when the sash and putty will be varnished, or if it is going to show through from the inside of the glass. Usually the putty is beveled back behind the "sight line" so it doesn't show from the inside, but occasionally a wider bevel is needed if the shoulder of glazing rabbet is just too narrow, or the top edge of the glass in the lower sash fits into a groove and I decide to not put putty in the groove.

Dry powdered pigments: it usually takes just a "pinch" of pigment for a fist-sized wad of putty. If you are adding so much that it makes the putty too stiff, add a few drops of linseed oil and kneed it in well to loosen up the putty to normal consistency.

Oil paints: usually about the volume of one or two peas is plenty for a fist-sized wad. If you are adding so much the putty becomes too loose or sticky, add a few pinches of dry powered whiting to bring the putty back to the usual consistency.

I've always kept with dry powdered earth pigments, because they are the same type of material (minerals from the earth) as the filler in the putty (powdered chalk or ground limestone), and so more likely to be compatible. This is based on what I learned in art school, where the goal is to make the painting last for centuries. That approach is based on paintings and other objects made of oils and pigments that have actually lasted for centuries. I don't expect my colored putty to last for centuries, but I do want it to have as long a service life as possible.

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:01 am; edited 1 time in total
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Vic



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 59
Location: NYC

PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oil paints in oil based putty works. BUT you will get the paint all over your hands when you glaze. I tint my putty gray (for stained glass work) using dry "concrete" colors. I use a table spoon for 3 1/2 gallons of putty for a medium gray color. These are light fast. NOT all dry colors will hold up under UV if outdoors.
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chopsieze



Joined: 08 Sep 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well have been busy with the holidays, etc. but I've refinished the windows and applied a dark stain. The rabbet is too small on a few and the putty can be seen from the inside (if I couldn't see it from the inside I wouldn't care) after doing some without tinting the putty I've decided it will look much better, since the outside will also be a dark color. The white putty looks kind of like a racing stripe. I think I'll try the dry pigments first and hope I can get it dark enough to not stand out so much.

Thanks for the help everyone!
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