Window Corks, for the serious cocooner
Post new topic   Reply to topic
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Interior Storm Windows  
View previous topic :: View next topic  

Interested in seeing the details?
Yes.
100%
 100%  [ 1 ]
Na, it wouldn't suit me.
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 1

Author Message
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:33 am    Post subject: Window Corks, for the serious cocooner Reply with quote

Since I haven't been able to occupy my old 1886 house lately, I've decided to save some energy by "corking" the windows from the inside much like John has done with his air panels. Mine may be more effecient, less expensive, and less time consuming to make.

Essentially they are 1" thick high dencity foam panels that have been cut to fit snuggly in the interior casing much like John's design. Some light gets through the pink stuff I use. Taking the corks out makes spring all the more enjoyable. And yes, the neighbors have commented on my "pink" shades. But the energy savings are impressive. I keep the heat at 50deg in a formerly drafty 4000 sqft house.

I could publish my heat bill before and after to show the performance. I've found a technique to cut the corks so they fit without any cracks even on odd shaped winows. What's that you say? Aren't all old house windows odd shaped and non-square? But of course.

I'll take the time to publish the details and pictures if you show me you're interested by voting above.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2940
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Peter, welcome to the Forum.

Do post some details on your window panels. I've done something similar, 1" thick foam panel with aluminum on both sides, then I "snapped" on some 2" dia. foam pipe insulation (the kind already split along it's length. They just pop into place, on the inside of the windows.

For readers' reference, here is a link to my Forum article on the interior air panels:

http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=6

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:37 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2940
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also, I'd like to learn more about your neighborhood association. I've worked closely with neighborhood associations in Omaha and Jacksonville, FL., giving talks, workshops and hands-on training sessions for tradespeople.

http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/education/seminars.htm

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

johnleeke wrote:
I've done something similar, 1" thick foam panel with aluminum on both sides, then I "snapped" on some 2" dia. foam pipe insulation (the kind already split along it's length.


Hey John,

Thanks for the welcome and interest.

I'll take some pictures when I'm making one. Energy savings when I get my tax recordkeeping done ... sometime in 2010 maybe.

Do you have a post on your foil backed foam rimmed window plugs?
Do you use the very flexible soft pipe insulation or the more rigid stuff?


Last edited by PeteBo on Mon Feb 04, 2008 12:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 8:41 pm    Post subject: What they look like when finished. Reply with quote

Here are some pictures of what these window corks look like installed. Procedures to follow.

01 Exterior view


02 Interior view of large bay window area. Flash on camera used.


03 Interior view of bay area as it appears to the eye with no lights on in the house. No flash used.


03 Close-up of interior view showing one window cork that seals well.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 9:21 pm    Post subject: Procedures Reply with quote

After several failed attempts, this is how I do it. If you find a better techique, let me know.

04 This will be the example window for the demonstration. It is an early installation that didn't use this measuring and cutting procedure. It took several attempts to get a cork that didn't have all these air gaps (call me slow).


05 Example window without cork.


06 Materials and tools. I chose Owens Corning FormulaR 150 Extruded Polystyrene because it was not crumbly. This stuff doesn't break up and it doesn't have the static buildup that other materials I've tried had. Some foams leave a mess on in the house and dirt clinging to the corks. This stuff is printed on one side only which is a plus for the outside view.


07 Record the rough measurements of all windows that you plan to cork. This will help with determining the cost and amount of foam to fill. It also helps plan how to cut the 4x8 sheets to the most economic advantage. The sheets I used had toung and grove edges and I found two smaller pieces can be clear packing taped together using this joint to make a usable panel.

08 Measure width of window opening to nearest 1/16" at top, center and bottom. If the measurements indicate a side is not straight, determine which one and try to mimic that deformation when cutting.


09 General technique for cutting foam board. I cut on an inexpensive through rug. The foam is durable enough to kneel on without damage. The drywall square is useful for making rough cuts and I flip it over if I need to make more than a 4' cut. You may roughly cut an oversized (1 excess each side) piece of foam. Make the first final cut with the print side (inside) of the cork face up. I usually start with the straightest side of the window opening. That way, if there is deformations in the other side, they are reproduced when laying out the top, mid, and lower measurements on the foam.


10 As with finishing putty when glazing windows, keep your wrist locked to the correct knife angle. The key to cutting is a fully extended sharp snap-off type knife and a low angle and cutting in several passes: 2-4. For the sides of the window, the tip of the blade is under the straight edge, closer to the center of the cork.


11 The wedge that is left over showing the angle I've found works. Roughly that of a bottle cork.


12 Then do the other side of the cork. Mark the width plus 1/4" for top, mid, lower, with a knife on inside (print side) of the foam.


13 Install the partially made cork with lower sides snug and parallel to the sides of the window opening. The upper edge will overlap the moulding.


14 Upper edge overlapping and lower edge not yet scribed (but looking pretty good anyway). Some windows are much less square.


15 Use a block of wood to scribe the lower edge to the slope and contour of the sill. Don't cut through the foam and cut the sash.


16 Finish bottom cut out of the window to avoid damage to sash.


17 Mark upper to corners with knife edge facing operator and blade flat against the top of the window opening.


18 With print side down, over cut the angle for the top of the cork, but start 1/8" shy of marking cuts.


19 The quality of cut is satisfactory when making several passes with a low angle on the snap off knife.


20 New cork installed with this procedure has no air gaps, fits snuggly, and will not blow out under normal conditions.


21 Mark each cork in constant corner with building, room, and side for hassle free reinstall.


22 Newly installed cork exposes air leak around window trim when we look down the side of the wall.


23 Simple technique for keeping the cork from blowing out during windy gusts. Blue painters tape may help if the pressure isn't too great. Yea, I've got some drafty windows and many without storms.


Hope that was clear. Let me know if the instructions can be improved.


Last edited by PeteBo on Mon Feb 04, 2008 9:45 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 9:42 pm    Post subject: Payback Reply with quote

Now that I've shown you how to do it, you're wondering if it is worth it. First of all, forget about those neighbors' comments about pink and your newly found reclusive nature. There's money and resources to be saved man!

Not all rooms have to be done to make this worth while. Not all mine are done because of difficulties reaching some interior windows (storage in front of them) and time. But with corks in about 60% of my windows and keeping the heat to 50degF, I'm sure I can save much more than the cost of installation in one year. It stands to reason that if the place were heated to 72degF, the corks would make an even bigger dollar savings in the heating bills vs. if they were installed/not installed with a 50degF interior.

I'll post the cost of materials (hundreds for a 4k sqft house), some gas bills before and after installation when I get those receipts recorded. Anyone want to help with this little effort?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2940
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a great series and an interesting energy saving method !

Keep an eye on the windows through the winter to check for moisture buildup indicated by condensation or frost on the glass, or water puddling on or dribbling from the stool.

If you find excessive moisture leave the panels off for several days to let the woodwork of the window frame and sash dry out.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the years I've used these, I've never had that problem, but understand the potential with any interior storm. It is a large house with few water generating occupants, and that may be the saving grace here.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Harold Pomeroy



Joined: 26 Apr 2006
Posts: 25
Location: Chesham Station, NH

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pete and John,
In the seventh picture above, there are instructions on the foam explaining that the installer should put a thermal barrier, like sheetrock, between the foam and air. This is because the foam is flammable. If you do have a fire, large amounts of flammable plastic don't help the situation in the building. Burning plastic gives off poisonous fumes.

I'm not one to swear by warnings written by torts lawyers (ie., "Warning: Do not store these thumbtacks in your shoes."), but in this case, I think there is a problem.

Harold
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2940
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Harold. It's always good to have more than one "head" in on this sort of thing.

When I have done these interior panels with foam board I have used a product called "Thermax." It is a polyisocyanurate insulation foam board. From the product label:

"...Thermax Sheathing is a favored insulating material because of its superior fire performance. The foam core sheathing boards, faced on both sides with solid aluminum foil, can be installed with any interior finish approved by local building codes, such as wood paneling. Thermax Sheathing can also be left exposed according to model building code making it an excellent interior basement insulation without the need of thermal barriers..."

also on the label (those lawyers speak with forked tongue):

"...Combustible; Protect from high heat sources. Local building codes may require a protective or thermal barrier. For more information consult MSDS, call Dow at 1866-583-2583 or contact your local building inspector. In an emergency, call 989 636-4400..."

The MSDS is the Material Safety Data Sheet, which even from a practical point of view, really should be studied before the use of any product, especially when using it in an unusual situation.

made by:

Dow Building Materials
989 636-4400
http://www.dow.com/styrofoam/na/thermax/

It is important to remember that every word on a building product label is about protecting the manufacturer and marketer from liability, and not about the practical side of how to use the product.

So, Thermax might be safer than Foamular, but what would be safer than Thermax? Gypsum wallboard, though not as insulating. For my interior storm-window/air-panels:

http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=6

I use wood and thin clear plastic film. Both are combustible materials, but there is much less material that with a 1" thick foam board.

The Thermax foam board might be the safest, if it's initial combustion rating is higher, which I suspect it is considering the heavy aluminum foil coating on both side. To keep the cut edges at that same rating they might have to be wrapped with 4" aluminum tape.

take care, work safe and keep in touch

John


Last edited by johnleeke on Thu Feb 07, 2008 4:25 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good eye Harold.

Because it wasn't a permanent installation and the place is rarely occupied, I didn't give fire rating as much consideration.

I wonder if houses with wall to wall carpeting and stuffed furniture are as much a risk as these panels.

There are several spray on fire retardants, I'll investigate if they are effective on foam.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PeteBo



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Fort Wayne, IN

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John, Thanks for the alternate suggestion of Thermax Sheathing. I'll try to get my hands on some.

In the mean time, does it compress enough to take up the last 1/16" of irregularity? Tell me more about its characteristics with respect to crumbling, fraying, compression, and memory.

The pink stuff I used has the ability to give just enough which allows the corks to seal without additional weather stripping. They are dense enough to kneel on but there will be a slight imprint of your knee when you get up which seems to go away after a while (no memory).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
jimmy325



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is because the foam is flammable. If you do have a fire, large amounts of flammable plastic don't help the situation in the building. Burning plastic gives off poisonous fumes.
_________________
Join Braindumps.com online training program to prepare for 70-649 exam. We offer best quality Pass4sure dumps to help you improve your test score.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Interior Storm Windows  
Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum