mend for broken glass
Post new topic   Reply to topic
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Windows & Doors  
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Sean



Joined: 27 Dec 2006
Posts: 170
Location: Salem, MA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:00 am    Post subject: mend for broken glass Reply with quote

I remember seeing here there was some product that you could use to "glue" broken glass so that the crack isn't visible. I did a look around, but I can't even remember how long ago it was. Is this product, if it even exists, expensive? I have wonderful circular crown glass sash panes but more than half are cracked. I would hate to have to get rid of them seeing how the likelyhood of replacement is almost nil.

Thanks.

Sean
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
sswiat



Joined: 01 Sep 2004
Posts: 231
Location: Cambria, New York

PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only glass glue/epoxy I am aware of is HXTAL available at www.talasonline.com which is a conservators supply house. It is somewhat tricky to use as you have to be accurate with the part mixture (mixed by gram weight). It also takes a fair amount of time to set up. You will need the release tape also.

It isn't cheap but with the small amount used to repair glass, one bottle will last a lifetime.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
jade



Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 785
Location: Hawley MA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i have used a product from http://www.deltakits.com/ ...they specialize in auto windshield crack fixes and polishing....i have used in on very old, extremely thin and unflat (waves and curves aplenty) with some success...the 1/2 ounce bottle of resin costs about $35...
30001 MagniBond Resin
http://www.deltakits.com/shopping/resins/product/80-30001-magnibond-resin-15-ml-plastic-bottle-with-glass-dropper
i have a uv lamp for gluing but you can sit the glued glass out in the sun for curing....



good luck...
...jade


Last edited by jade on Tue Sep 07, 2010 12:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2926
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have had success healing cracked glass using Loctite 350. It is a one-part ultra-violet cure adhesive formulated especially for glass. Set the glass in sunlight for 20-30 minutes for cure.

It is usually more readily available than Hxtal. I get it at my local hardware store where they have a big display of many Loctite products. I suspect it is available online.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2926
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2013 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try LocTite Glass Glue. Readily available, low cost, refractive index similar to most window glass so joint is not so apparent, quick cure time, actually works. http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/sg_glass/technical-data/Loctite-Glass-Glue.htm. I've used it by setting the two pieces of glass in the bedding putty with the broken joint slightly open, then applying the glue, then moving the two pieces together, adjusting the two pieces of glass optically to get them in the same plane, letting the glue set for 20 minutes, then finishing the glazing. First use in place for about 20 years, still holding up.
_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Don Wagstaff



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 100

PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2013 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

Always difficult to make a good picture from inside out of windows but if you zoom in on the center window's upper half and look at the pane right behind the curled tail of the dangling latch handle you might make out a special kind of glass repair I had done on some old salvaged glass. The repair itself now being more the reason for being than the simple pane of glass. The repair was done in more of an art deco, tiffanies style with a brass joint than I would have liked, lead being more similar to the rest of the interior would have been a better choice there.

Greetings,

Don Wagstaff



DSC01677.JPG - Version 2.JPG
 Description:
 Filesize:  2.52 MB
 Viewed:  256 Time(s)

DSC01677.JPG - Version 2.JPG


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2926
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don, do you think you could get a closeup shot of that leaded glass repair? Try taking it at night or on an overcast day, or in the morning or evening when it is not full daylight outside.
_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Don Wagstaff



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 100

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I will try John, even though I sold the house but it's just a mile up the road.

Don
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2926
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent. Thank you.
_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
SashGuy



Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 147
Location: Houston

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don, Beautiful job. What was your process? I tried this with copper foil and ended up burning myself with popping slag.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cabinfeverarts



Joined: 05 Aug 2008
Posts: 113

PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lead came is the way to go. Copper foil is not weather proof. It may hold up in your climate and for your purposes, but copper foil is not meant for architectural use.

When I did stained glass as a hobby only, I didn't know this and made two architectural windows with copper foil. Oops. Now I regret it. The air and water seeps through and they are less supple against wind (cracks developed). The putty from lead came would have been a cushion against movement.

_________________
Sidney
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Windows & Doors  
Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum