corroded tin roof drip edge
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mateo



Joined: 02 Oct 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 11:43 am    Post subject: corroded tin roof drip edge Reply with quote

Hi,
I have a tin roof over my front porch and i just noticed that the front drip edge where the metal curves down into the gutter has corroded all along the front. I also noticed what looks like copper flashing underneath the metal and on top of the tongue and groove decking.
I need to re-paint the roof but am unsure about how to fix the corroded holes in the front. Is there a certain material you can use to lay on top of the metal and then paint over??
Also - while i'm asking questions....the gutter has a few pin holes and seems to be copper. do i have to screw in copper flashing and then silicone the edges? or is there another metal that is safe to use.

thanks for any info you can provide!

Amy

ps- i am in the process of stripping the paint from the porch - that's why it looks like it's in disrepair ;-)



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Jeremy Ballard



Joined: 22 Mar 2008
Posts: 127
Location: Providence, RI and Cape Cod, MA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amy,

You have a few options ranging in cost.

You can paint the existing tin roof with a product called Acrymax which is an elastomeric paint designed for this kind of repair. It comes in colors and rolls on with a roller and has a fabric that is bedded into the paint. Easy to do with no stinky fumes. The transition of roof to house could be iffy unless you install new flashing to the brick. I've use this product for built-in gutter repairs. It's not a forever fix but will last a good number of years if the surface is prepped right.

www.acrymax.com/construction_products.htm

You can take the tin off and install a EPDM(rubber) roof. This is generally the method that is used. I always use a nice copper drip edge around the perimeter, either the larger residential profile or a commercial profile if you need extra depth. You can skin the existing deck with 1/2" ply and glue the rubber to that instead of the fiber board backer with the big washers for a cleaner look. You will need to replace the transition flashing between the brick and roof deck. I would one flashing that the rubber is glued to and then one on top of that to protect that glue joint.

Option 3 is that you can have a new tin roof installed.

It's hard to see but I think the copper flashing you are seeing is a repair. The gutters are likely galvanized steel. The fastest way to see is to grab a magnet.

Holes in copper can be soldered without a problem.

Hope this helps.







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mateo



Joined: 02 Oct 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 5:02 pm    Post subject: more questions... Reply with quote

Hi Jeremy,
thanks so much for your reply!

Funny - the company you suggested is where i previously lived and about a half and hour away.

i cannot afford to put in a new roof - i am trying to do most of the work of restoring my 1885 queen anne by myself - so the first option is the only one for me.

I do have a question: can i get away with scrubbing the metal roof with tsp and a wire brush - or do you recommend powerwashing?
Also, would I apply copper flashing over what is there now at the transition from roof to brick house? and if so - how do you attach it?

Thanks for the magnet trick - i'll test it out. If my gutters are galvanized steel, what material do you suggest to repair the holes??

thanks again,
Amy
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Jeremy Ballard



Joined: 22 Mar 2008
Posts: 127
Location: Providence, RI and Cape Cod, MA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wire brush, putty knife, scraper, TSP and a respirator in case of lead. Lead paint was used up until 1978. I would think that as long as all the loose bits are taken care of the Acrymax should hold fine. Take care not to paint the bricks because it won't come off.

I don't advocate power washing anything really. Water gets forced into so many places that it's not supposed to be. It's really just bad all around even though you see everyone doing it.

I think you idea of installing new copper drip edge is good. You can also use regular brown aluminum drip edge if you wanted. Regular roofing nails will work, make sure you don't nail through the sheathing, you don't want to see the nails from below. You could apply it right over what's there, the Acrymax will cover and seal the top flange. I don't think I would roll the paint over the face.

You could use a colored silicone from the cleaned inside for the small holes in the gutter. Bigger holes may require replacement or silicone a piece of lead on the clean inside and paint it on the show side.

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mateo



Joined: 02 Oct 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jeremy,
Thanks again for your help! I agree with the powerwashing - i just read about people doing it to prep so i thought i'd ask.
water is the enemy and i am trying to preserve the woodwork on the porch after years of people painting over alligatored wood and rotting wood.

Here are a few stupid questions:
will using aluminum over top of what's already there create corrosion because of the 2 non-similar metals? And....what is a "top flange" and what does "paint over the face" mean?

Jeremy Ballard wrote:

I think you idea of installing new copper drip edge is good. You can also use regular brown aluminum drip edge if you wanted. Regular roofing nails will work, make sure you don't nail through the sheathing, you don't want to see the nails from below. You could apply it right over what's there, the Acrymax will cover and seal the top flange. I don't think I would roll the paint over the face.


Sorry! all of this is new to me - but i want to do a good job and make sure that i only have to do this once (or not very often;-)

thanks,
Amy
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Jeremy Ballard



Joined: 22 Mar 2008
Posts: 127
Location: Providence, RI and Cape Cod, MA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think that there is an issue with tin and aluminum. They are used together as an alloy.

Drip edge looks kinda like a Z. The top of the Z being 4" or 6" the diagonal down being an inch or so and the bottom being about 3/8" and still mostly pointing down to kick the water away.

The top flange being the top 4-6" of the Z which seals to the roof. I was referring to "painting over the face" meaning the lower 2 sections of the Z, the section that shows.

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mateo



Joined: 02 Oct 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got it!
that makes sense now - thanks for the description. I was just re-attaching the very heavy downspout which does in fact seem to be copper on the inside and lead on the outside.

i really appreciate all of your knowledge and willingness to share!

-Amy
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Dennis@RCR



Joined: 26 Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Location: Chardon, Ohio

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amy,

You have a standing seam terne roof. You will not be able to install drip edge without much difficulty and roofing experience.

If you have no holes in the roofing itself, you would be better off just wire brushing any loose paint and re painting with metal primer and paint. If you apply a coating and it does not stick 100%, you can have voids between the coating and the roofing which will cause much more corrosion and rusting of the steel.

The copper edging behind the corroded steel looks like it goes the length of the roof. From what I can see in the picture. I would wire brush the steel, paint, and leave as is. Adds character.

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mateo



Joined: 02 Oct 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Dennis

The roof is in pretty good shape other than the drip edge and needing a coat of paint. I haven't been able to get up there and see if there are are holes that go through the backing copper as well but i will use all of your advice and prep the surface really well.

Thanks!
-Amy
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