Window Screens
Post new topic   Reply to topic
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Windows & Doors  
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
HIPR2324



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 1:56 am    Post subject: Window Screens Reply with quote

I am planning to make traditional residential window
> screens, double hung, the same width or size close to my sashes. Is there
> a replacement for wood( insect-proof, easy to use, water-resistant) like
> Koma or Azek trim boards for example that have the strength to support a
> window screen?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jade



Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 786
Location: Hawley MA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey and welcome to the site....

tight grained eastern white pine is still available but not typically at your neighborhood lumber yard...spanish cedar and mahogany are naturally insect and water resistent...

apply a preservative, primer and at least two coats of finish paint...

your choice of joinery will determine strength with any product you use...

good luck......
.....jade
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 568
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, thought I'd pipe in here. I am taking an order from a customer later today for 23 screens. I made and installed the same number of storm window just before Christmas. I
I used Cypress for the storm but was pulling my hair out trying to get the slow penetrating oil to dry on the Cypress. The oils in the Cypress fight a little with the oil primer and it takes a while for them to settle down so the oil primer can dry.

I have decided to use Cypress again for the screens. The very oils that fight a little with the oil primer is what protects the wood from decay and bugs. I think there's enough evidence here and other place on line to justify using this wood for exterior use. And it works very well and is lightweight.

It takes about 2 weeks for the oil primer to dry. Wiping down the frames with mineral spirits prior to priming does help. providing a place with higher heat and low humidity help to keep the oils from migrating to the surface and to the oil primer.

I've built three other storms with Cypress since last December but I primed them with a fast drying oil primer. I was very satisfied with the drying time and have decided to use the fast dry oil primer for these screens.

Can't get Cypress from the local lumber yards either so you'll need to find a place that sells woodworking lumber. Try to buy Cypress grown in the US.

Steve S
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
TDL



Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Posts: 253

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 9:35 am    Post subject: Re: Window Screens Reply with quote

HIPR2324 wrote:
I am planning to make traditional residential window
> screens, double hung, the same width or size close to my sashes. Is there
> a replacement for wood( insect-proof, easy to use, water-resistant) like
> Koma or Azek trim boards for example that have the strength to support a
> window screen?


The Koma I have used is Junk. Azek and Versatex is much better. Neither are a good material to make screens from IMO. From searching online it appears a few people made screen doors from azek with varying results.

I have seen them joined together and reinforced with steel to make pergolas. One year in the field and they still look good. Very $$$$

I have used Azek on my own house for window stops and trim. No problems after one year. From talking to the rep the expansion for my windows (60") is minimal. I also have some Azek sills in the field without any problems. I am in the process of switching to Versatex since it doesn't have the ugly bright white finish Azek has and the ends are sealed from the factory. Azek claims they are sealed but I have yet to see it.

Next project is replacing the ugly aluminum siding with Hardi and Versatex stealth trim products. It will be interesting to see how they hold up. Since everything will remain white I do not foresee many issues. I like using my house as a testing ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
HIPR2324



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 10:48 am    Post subject: Window Screens Reply with quote

So, basically so far, what I am hearing, there really isn't a material besides wood which is durable or strong enough to make a good screen. I was going to reinforce the corners with flat bar, but that would be costly, and it would look terrible. I could drill and put a rod in them but how much do you want to do for a screen. Cedar sounds interesting. Most of the plastics you can paint, but I am afraid the sun will cause it to bend. Pergolas are totally different because there is enough strength and material plus support to keep them strong. A screen has to be durable on its own. Need more input this is good.

Last edited by HIPR2324 on Fri Feb 19, 2010 1:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 568
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The most durable and strongest way to join two pieces of wood for a frame is with good ol mortise and tenon. Nothing better and doesn't take long to learn how.

Steve S
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
HIPR2324



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 1:49 pm    Post subject: Window Screens Reply with quote

The question is not joinery, but material.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TDL



Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Posts: 253

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:42 pm    Post subject: Re: Window Screens Reply with quote

HIPR2324 wrote:
So, basically so far, what I am hearing, there really isn't a material besides wood which is durable or strong enough to make a good screen.


Aluminum screens work just fine.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
HIPR2324



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 5:00 pm    Post subject: Window Screens Reply with quote

I am trying to keep the wood or so called historic look of wood. Your right, Aluminum would last, but they will never look the same, or have the texture. Some of the new materials are getting really close and are acceptable historically. Naturally, they will never be totally true.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jeremy Ballard



Joined: 22 Mar 2008
Posts: 127
Location: Providence, RI and Cape Cod, MA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Composite trim material has no structural strength. It's bendy no matter what thickness. If you buy a 20' length of 1" material (the shortest I can get at a real lumber yard) and stand in the middle with your hand over your head the two ends will touch the ground.

Composite trim moves, quite a lot. The size of the piece you cut will vary due to temperature in both length and width. I have noticed movement in even the smallest "boards". This movement is strong enough to pull nails and move surrounding materials.

The staples you need to hold your screen in won't hold. Fasteners in general don't hold composite to composite unless glue is used. Glue works best.

It breaks easily. It chips.

It smells to high heavens when milled. It melts when milled or cut.

It's hard to seal with the recommended caulk in the best circumstances.

The glue is smelly and can make you high.

Customer service for the product that I have used was terrible at best.....and that was the owner I was speaking to.

You will be hard pressed to find someone on this forum to endorse composite trim and give you the answer you are looking for. If you want someone to sing the praises of composite trim you can try the JLC forums. You will likely find my rant there also along with many who will sing it's praises.

_________________
Jeremy
Heritage Restoration, Inc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jeremy Ballard



Joined: 22 Mar 2008
Posts: 127
Location: Providence, RI and Cape Cod, MA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

and static, I forgot the static. The dust will stick to everything.

It sucks to vacuum the clients lawn because the dust won't biodegrade and it's bright white.

I haven't use a ton of composite trim but the little I have used in my travels have literally left a bad taste in my mouth. I've stopped using it. I might be the only one to notice some of these downfalls but I won't use the stuff anymore. I'm done.

_________________
Jeremy
Heritage Restoration, Inc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
HIPR2324



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 8:32 pm    Post subject: Window Screens Reply with quote

Thanks Jeremy, I thought that was the case. I have never gotten a straight answer from the manufacturer and the lumber yards guys really have no idea. I am probably going top use mahogany. I like wood anyway.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Windows & Doors  
Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum