Glass Cleaning
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Bron



Joined: 14 Dec 2010
Posts: 6
Location: NW Indiana

PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Steve!

It was nice meeting you, and I hope you had a nice visit to the big city.

Coming from a woodworking tradition far different than windows, it took me a while to figure out why the rails and stiles aren't glued in window sash; then I had my "ah-ha" moment. Correct me if I'm wrong, but there is no need to glue, as as soon as the glass is pointed in to a little bed of putty, the glass is holding everything together; then the seal putty, and after that is relatively hard, everything is solid.

By not gluing, it is much easier to replace parts when needed; traditional sash is really built for the long run.

I'm giving that 'other" association about a 15 year run on their plastic widows; and we'll be seeing the boards propping windows open.

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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2937
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Traditionally, the wooden frame of the sash is intended to hold and protect the glass pane, which is far more fragile that the wooden parts of the frame. Some sashmakers today say they glue the glass to the sash with sealant because they depend on the glass to hold their sash stable. Perhaps modern glass is strong enough to do that, but it sounds like backwards thinking to me.

Quote:
By not gluing [the sash joints], it is much easier to replace parts when needed; traditional sash is really built for the long run.


You have got this right, definitely built for the long run. With no glue in the sash joints water can migrate out of the joint, keeping the joint decay free. Glue in the joint can trap water there leading to fungal decay.

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Bron



Joined: 14 Dec 2010
Posts: 6
Location: NW Indiana

PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I need to mention some points on whiting. There is the natural product, which is ground chalk. There is precipitated calcium carbonate, which is a chemically formed product. If you have a choice, precipitated is a finer and more consistent product. I've seen natural whiting with some coarse bits.

If you add about a tablespoon or two to a 28 oz. glass cleaner recipe, it will spray, but you'll need to shake it good, as it will settle.

http://apps.webcreate.com/ecom/catalog/product_specific.cfm?ClientID=15&ProductID=23686

Talas carries both kinds; for glass, I would go with the precipitated, for it's uniformity.

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Andy in NH



Joined: 01 Mar 2006
Posts: 92
Location: Lyndeborough, NH

PostPosted: Tue Dec 28, 2010 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I keep some whiting in a pint container and just dab a dampened rag in it for cleaning when needed. Works great!
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2012 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am testing a new method for cleaning window glass.

Melamine foam sponges are made of a micro-fine abrasive. The flexible sponge is made of melamine plastic resin that breaks down into a very fine abrasive while wiping a surface. The broken down material is sharp shards that are "nearly as hard as glass." Some of the flexible sponge products, such as "Mr.Clean Magic Eraser Cleaning Pads" also contain a highly refined mineral spirits. In use the sponge is dampened slightly with water and lightly wiped or gently rubbed on the surface.

I have had some success cleaning "weathered" window glass surfaces that are somewhat clouded by micro-irregularities and surface accumulations of stubborn putty and mineral deposits.

Keep in mind that old window glass varies a lot in hardness and some can be "soft" when compared to modern float glass. The melamine abrasive may be hard enough to create optical effects on some glass that may appear as a slight cloudiness or "halo" effects in some lighting conditions and observation situations. Spot, circular or random wiping may increase these optical effect, diagonal straight-line wiping minimizes them.

Always test new methods and materials on waste glass before using on important glass. This is a very aggressive material even when used with light wiping. Cleaning methods are best developed from a least aggressive to most aggressive range, using the least aggressive that give acceptable results. This method is definitely at the more aggressive end of the range.

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