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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 8:33 am    Post subject: Hardware Reply with quote

(update: 10/7/12)
Window Hardware

To clean grunge off of metal parts,

First try to understand what type of soiling or grunge is on what type of metal. If the soiling is relatively loose particles of household dust or paint particles a simple mechanical brushing may work. If the grunge is attached with a water-soluble material, water and a mild detergent may work. Or, more aggressive solvents like alcohol or mineral spirits may be needed. Test in very small areas to determine the type of soiling or grunge, and to understand what the metal surface beneath is like. It may just be plain metal, or it may have an original "patinated" finish that you would want to save, and not clean away by accident.

Clean it up with the least aggressive method that gives a satisfactory result. Try out less aggressive methods and materials first, then progress to more aggressive, until the parts are clean enough. Here is a typical progression:

-- Blow off with compressed air, or brush with a soft long-bristle bench brush, then try a long-bristle whisk brush with broom corn bristles.

-- Brush with a soft or medium-stiff short-bristle scrub brush, work dry. If that's not clean enough try a stiffer-bristle brush.

-- Wet scrub with just water, or water with a bit of mild detergent. Rinse with clear water and dry immediately with a hair dryer or hot-air gun, or by placing in an open oven at 140 degrees. (do not use an oven that is used to cook food)

-- Wet scrub with mineral spirits, wipe with clean rag damped with mineral spirits.

-- Soft or medium brass or bronze brush, working gently by hand. A more aggressive steel wire brush is not usually needed.

-- Steel wire brush wheel mounted on an arbor or electric motor: this will probable scratch the surface of the hardware, but may be justified in few cases.



To remove paint from metal parts, simmer gently a few hours or over night in an electric "crock pot" filled with water. Try adding one of these to make this more effective:

- non-sudsing detergent (like Dirtex or TSP Substitute), tiny amounts
- baking soda
- fabric softener

Use fresh distilled water to help prevent kick starting rust on steel and iron. Do not add vinegar, which is a acid that can corrode steel and iron, or etch into the surface of copper, brass and bronze.

Then remove the softened paint by scrubbing with a soft or stiff bristle brush.

If you've got tons of hardware to clean and lots of capital an ultra-sonic cleaning sink with give you a much faster production rate.

After using water to clean ferrous metal mechanisms like pulleys dry thoroughly by warming gently for an hour with forced heated air or in a ventilated oven. If there are springs do not let the temperature go over 140 degrees F.

To treat rusty metal use a tanic acid treatment. Products include Rust Reformer by Rustoleum, and Rust Converter from Gemplers. Both of these have the tanic acid treatment and an waterborne acrylic primer in one product that may be suitable for metal that is going to be painted. Here is Sue Maltby's excellent article:
http://books.google.com/books?id=WUJ6uZRcn14C&q=rust#v=snippet&q=rust&f=false

If you want to use the tanic acid treatment and stick with oil-based materials in your finish you can mix your own tanic acid treatment:
http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca/crc/notes/html/9-5-eng.aspx

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Last edited by johnleeke on Wed Nov 19, 2014 11:10 am; edited 13 times in total
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rncx



Joined: 21 Jun 2008
Posts: 660
Location: Little Rock, AR

PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

to add...

for brass or copper parts that you lose patina on from scrubbing or scratching or whatever.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=978

the above is the chemical they use to make new "oiled bronze" hardware. it's a light acid, harmless to touch (but don't drink it...), and will darken your brass back to whatever patina you prefer, up to solid flat black, in a minute or two.

it loses effectiveness each time you reuse the same bottle of liquid but it can be saved and reused over and over to an extent.

it isn't strong enough to harm plastic, i use those disposable ziplock plastic tubs to dip stuff in.

simply submerge until you get the color you're looking for, pull it out with pliers or something to avoid fingerprints, and wash with clean water to neutralize, then buff residue off with a paper towel after it dries.

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cabinfeverarts



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2011 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the directions. I tried it and it couldn't have worked better. Now I've got a lot more to do....


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Sidney
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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sidney, that looks good. Did you add anything to the water? How long did you let it simmer?
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cabinfeverarts



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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I didn't add anything to the water. I can't remember exactly how long it was but it was in terms of a few hours.
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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An old folk recipe for cleaning corrosion from metal is to soak and scrub the metal with a mixture of salt and vinegar, or with various consumer products that contain salt and vinegar or other acids.

Here's something I learned from the metal specialists at the Campbell Center. The use of acid and salt for cleaning metal is generally not recommended because it can lead to even more aggressive corrosion in the future. Bulk acid and salt can remain in nooks & crannies and also can become established chemically in the tiny pits and scratches on the surfaces. To mitigate this after cleaning soak the hardware in baking soda and water, rinse three times with long soaks in distilled water, then oven dry.

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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. You can get the paint off by boiling or simmering in water.
2. Clean any remaining paint off with synthetic or natural bristle brush, but not with a steel bristle brush.
3. Heat the metal parts to dry them, not over 140 F. or springs may loose their temper.
4. If it is ferrous metal and there is heavy flaking rust remove it by careful chipping. If it is just light rust it can be brushed with a with synthetic or natural bristle brush.

For that hardware at the training session it was a wax finish, leaving the natural color of the metal.

5. Wax finish. Use a micro-crystalline wax. There are petro-chemical micro-crystalline waxes and beeswax is a natural micro-chystaline wax. Warm the metal just enough to melt the wax, rub the wax onto the metal and assure that it flows as a liquid into all the nooks and crannies. Let it cool. Rub off the extra wax with a coarse rag.


Paint finish for ferrous metal with slight surface rust.
Do 1-4 above. For the first treatment use a product that combines a tannic acid and acrylic resin primer. One product name is "Rust Reformer." Then apply two top coats of oil-based alkyd-resin enamel paint.

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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2014 10:01 am    Post subject: Vibratory Tumber Reply with quote

For cleaning metal surfaces of smaller parts in a production situation a vibratory tumbler can produce efficient results.

The parts are tumbled in a machine with a media that works and "scrubs" the metal surfaces.

Ray Tech is a common USA make that has replacement parts available:
http://www.raytechmetalfinishing.com/vibratory-tumblers-tombstone.php

An 18-pound unit can work with a half-dozen large pulleys or a dozen smaller ones, or many more smaller latches, screws, etc.

Used tumblers are often available at lower prices on eBay:
http://tinyurl.com/nk8fs75

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Bruce



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2014 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can remove rust fairly simply using electrolysis. There are a number of articles on the web but this one is fairly detailed. It will also remove paint.

http://www.robotroom.com/Rust-Removal-2.html

May not make sense for a bunch of small rusty parts and screws but is a useful method nonetheless and washing soda is easily found at grocery store and very inexpensive.

Obviously do at your own risk!
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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any rust? If not warm it to 140F. for half an hour to dry it off, then while hot dip it in Penetrol, and let it dry without wiping. For added protection and longer maintenance cycle, dip again, and let dry. This will form a solid film to provide some protection from moisture.
If rusty, chip off scaley rust, give the tannic acid treatment first. this will convert the tightly bonded rust half way back to metallic iron.
Paint would probably give a longer maintenance cycle. Remove scaley rust, treat remaining rust and prime with a tannic/acrylic then 3 or 4 thin coats of oil-based enamel. The old fashioned zinc-chromate primer is good but pay attention to the health risks.
To prevent corrosion and lubricate (without forming a solid film) consider Ship-2-Shore for hardware, tools and machinery: http://www.ship-2-shore.com/

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mw40784



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PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2016 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can use Vinegar, Dawn Dish Soap, Warm Water and old toothbrush.
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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2016 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would not use vinegar because it is acidic and can eat into the metal.
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