Cannot decide on latex or oil-based paint for windows
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JSMeece



Joined: 29 Jan 2014
Posts: 4
Location: St. Albans, WV

PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:49 am    Post subject: Cannot decide on latex or oil-based paint for windows Reply with quote

New to the forum, but have been reading post and topics for several months. I have purchased John’s books, all of them I think, great books, thank you John for writing them. I am going to bit the bullet this year and start repairing all of my original 1916 double hung windows, only 14 of them, small house 1750 square feet.

I am in the process of stockpiling supplies: bronze weatherstripping, sash cord, bowling alley wax, Abatron wood restoration kit, Sarco Type M putty, glazing points, etc. Exhausting shopping on-line, I am trying to staying away for the big box stores.

Now the question at hand, I am starting to look at what type of paint to use, or brand, been looking at either Benjamin Moore or Sherman Williams. There is not a single BM store in my area, I will have to get BM primer and paint trough Ace Hardware stores in the area. But, there seems to be several SW stores in the county. I will be using a slow drying oil-based exterior primer either BM Moorwhite exterior wood primer 100 or SW exterior oil-based wood primer Y24W8020. Both of which seem to be slow drying penetrating oil-based primers. So, I got that covered, just do not which brand to use.

I have read on this forum that several people recommend latex as exterior topcoat while others recommend oil-based enamel. I have done research on both BW and SW paints the past several weeks. I cannot find an enamel paint that contains a fungus or mildew inhibitor. If I decide to use oil-based enamel can I add an inhibitor to the paint? I want an exterior paint that will last a while. I have been told and read on this forum that a good quality latex, like SW duration, will last longer without pealing than an oil-based enamels. But, I have also read that enamel is preferred for window tracks since latex can remain “sticky.”

I would like to know so I use oil or latex for the exterior topcoat?

I will be stripping the window frames and sashes down to bare wood as much as possible, using steam and a lot of elbow grease, if this makes an difference if your recommendations.

I believe the exterior of the windows are now painted in latex but have old lead based oil paint under that, and yes safety procedures will be followed when stripping the lead based paint.

I would like to say thank you all of you for the invaluable information I have gathered from this site.

Thanks Jamie


Last edited by JSMeece on Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Steve Jordan



Joined: 09 Mar 2014
Posts: 9
Location: Rochester, NY

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jamie, I have had great luck using either Rustoleum oil based enamel or Ace Hardware oil based enamel over exterior oil primer (I don't use "quick dry" primers). These are not really "wood" paints but work great because they dry quick and hard. I've returned to look at work done 10 years ago and find the windows (sashes) in good condition. Oil paint is more forgiving of a sloppy paint job. Latex paint will stick (block) forever when applied sloppy and allowed to fill spaces between moving parts. Although Duration (SWP) is a great paint, it borders on an elastomeric quality and is not great for windows. That flexible-stay-soft-forever and cover-in-one-coat quality so desired for house-painting is not so great for windows, even when the brushwork is neatly feathered toward moving parts. If using SWP latex paint, consider the older line of Super Paint.
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JSMeece



Joined: 29 Jan 2014
Posts: 4
Location: St. Albans, WV

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Steve for replying.
I noticed that SW does make an oil based exterior enamel. Do you have any experience using it?

My original plan was to use an oil-based topcoat but noticed that a lot people on this forum say that they have been using water-based latex as a topcoat, just curious what the outcome had been good or bad.

I believe I will go with SW oil-based exterior primer instead of the BM Moorwhite, mainly for convenience and since SW is having a 30 percent of sale, well with coupon anyone can print from their website, for the remainder of March. Win-win in my book.
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Steve Jordan



Joined: 09 Mar 2014
Posts: 9
Location: Rochester, NY

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sherwin Williams still sells their very fine oil based house paint in quarts. This is great paint but dries very slowly. They may make some of the new water clean-up alkyds but I am unfamiliar with them. The SWP quick dry oil based primer dries WAY too quick for me - especially in warm weather. The Benjamin Moore quick dry Fresh Start dries much more slowly and is a GREAT primer. BM's other Fresh Start primer is a slow drying penetrating primer for siding, etc. If you go with the SWP oil paint, wait a few days to stack or install the sashes, it stays soft for awhile. One reason I like the fast drying, hard paint is because by the next day I can put thirty sashes in my van drive to the site and they will not be banged up at all. Can't do that with latex without drop-cloths or cardboard between each sash. I realize this may not be important to you.

steve
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Steve Jordan



Joined: 09 Mar 2014
Posts: 9
Location: Rochester, NY

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more thing, the SWP enamel you mentioned may be their version of the Rustoleum enamel. If so, it would be fine. This paint is usually recommended for lawn furnture, etc. but is OK for wood, too.
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JSMeece



Joined: 29 Jan 2014
Posts: 4
Location: St. Albans, WV

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I keep forgetting about SWP Exterior Oil Base Series. I think I will give that one a try. Hope it drys as hard an enamel.

As for the primer, I am looking at SW exterior oil-based primer, which according to the label takes 2 to 4 hours dry to touch at temperature above 45 degrees. Should I look for a primer that takes longer to dry?

Like BM Fresh Start Moorwhite (100), the label says it takes 6 to 8 hours at 77 degrees. So since this one takes longer to dry it penetrates deeper into the wood structure, correct.

Is there another brand of slow drying primer you can recommend other than BW and SW?
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Steve Jordan



Joined: 09 Mar 2014
Posts: 9
Location: Rochester, NY

PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2014 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think most slow drying exterior primers will perform about the same - these are good on weathered wood and new wood. The quick dry Fresh Start is sort-of a hybrid between and quick dry and slow dry and I've never had a problem with it. I avoid quick dry primers like Kilz or Cover Stain, etc. because they don't penetrate the wood adequately. Sorry but I can't comment on others, SWP and BM are the only two paints I purchase although there are plenty more good ones.
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impact1839



Joined: 12 Feb 2009
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 9:29 pm    Post subject: Duration on Windows Reply with quote

I have used Duration on all my windows and 5 years later they are in pristine condition. Better than I could have ever imagined. I used Super paint in the beginning and switched to Duration after a few windows. The difference is beyond remarkable. The windows painted with Superpaint look like they need to be painted again. The Duration painted windows looked like I painted the yesterday. My thoughts on anyone complaining about the elastomeric quality causing issues with raising the windows used a mate finish perhaps
Anyone who has done as I have stated above can not deny the superiority of this paint. It is remarkable. I would love to hear anyone who has used the next step of Emerald line.

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