Sash restoration progress
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Sat Oct 10, 2015 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finally finishing that storm and working on the sash and frame. Cleaned up the weather stripping with steel wool and sash runs like a dream now. Brought my easel outside as it was so nice out but make sure you clamp things down so a breeze does not ruin your day. Note that i had reinforced this storm last year with L brackets on the center rail. I decided to leave them be as the original joins were not that strong on this one.


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Weather stripping dirty and clean
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Painting sash on easel
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L bracket detail
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Not quite perfect but not too bad.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2940
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Julie, you're sash painting is getting better, with nice even lap onto the glass.
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 11:51 am    Post subject: Caulk removal to free top sash & install storm Reply with quote

The upper sash was a bear to remove as it was nailed, heavily caulked and painted shut. I used a hairdryer to loosen the putty which was much easier and less risky than using heat gun or steam. Cut with razor and window zipper - i really like the wooden handle one that has flat face with jagged edges (i'll try to add photo). A linoleum cutter worked well to gently pry out pieces of caulk. Tedious (took about 1 hour) but worth it, sash intact and without too much damage to wood.


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Another view of the tool.
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This is the tool I like. Red Devil "Windo-Zipper" ( no 'w'). Unfortunately they make not make these anymore. Someone handy could make their own. Here's a better photo.
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Lower sash out, upper sash next...
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Top sash - entire seam was filled with caulk
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Most of the caulk did not come out this neatly.
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Last edited by JulieL on Mon Dec 14, 2015 9:43 pm; edited 4 times in total
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 4:40 pm    Post subject: The Reward Reply with quote

I removed the double-hungs to work on and in the meantime I installed the storm I repaired and the interior storm I made last year. Seems pretty snug. Look how beautiful that storm is - i like the green which is closer to the originals which had been painted over in white. And the reflection is like having a framed painting on the side of the house!


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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The esthetic benefit of all that detailed work.
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2015 8:59 pm    Post subject: Muntin Mystery Solved Reply with quote

See below[/list]

Last edited by JulieL on Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:45 pm; edited 1 time in total
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:32 pm    Post subject: Muntin Mystery Solved Reply with quote

I took this sash out a year ago in hopes of fixing the bowed meeting rail. But I couldn't move the rail. These sash were mass produced around 1920 and the base of each muntin was stapled or nailed to the rail. But i couldn't see how to get them out. Finally figured it out so I can repair it.

I am going to try John's suggestion to drill a hole thru rail & muntin to insert a dowel or rod to realign and secure the rail in place. Wooden dowel or fiberglass rod? Glue or epoxy in? And clamp to pull rail back in place - it feels good, will easily go straight. That would mean that the sash locks will function again as will the Accurate weather stripping (currently removed but in good shape).

See 4/17 post below for an update of how this sash looks now. It's great to have the 'before' pictures to have perspective on all the work done.



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The meeting rail is worn and weathered so will be getting treatment with borate, consolidant, epoxy just where necessary, and finish with varnish. Gentle treatment here because of the clear finish; i won't have the luxury of hiding anything with paint!
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The muntin was nailed to the meeting rail as you can see because the rail has weathered and bowed.
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The nails were not put in thru the bottom of the rail. Tiny dents revealed they were put in at an angle from the side of the muntin, 1" finishing nails, countersunk. With a knife and needlenose pliers I was able to extract them so I will be able to straig
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Last edited by JulieL on Wed Apr 05, 2017 9:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2015 10:28 pm    Post subject: Exterior Screen and temporary storm Reply with quote

Here's a look at the exterior screens that swap out when the storms come off. These were made later than the storms; I suspect they just kept the storms on and swung them open, keeping them open with hooks. I only have 2 screens like this but it looks like even I could make these with a little help on cutting the ends. Dowels secure the center rail, lapped joints rather than mortise and tenon on the corners, and screen tacked in with molding.

But this year i am using one as a temporary storm as the full storm needs serious work or replacement (my temp fix of the center rail is shown on an earlier post. It made it thru the winter which was the plan).

Screen fitted with clear plastic on the inside using double stick tape and then nailing on molding inside. Hoping that keeps it secure thru wind and snow for this season. I salvaged pile of beautiful meeting rails & molding (sadly I could not convince the owner to keep his wood windows) which I used here (shown in last photo).



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This is the interior of the screen made into a temp storm with plastic secured with tape and molding. Not elegant but the real storm is not ready and its cold outside.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2015 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Julie,

OK, on that bowed meeting rail:

To recommend the material and diameter of the pin or dowel, I'd need to know the overall dimensions of the muntin.

John

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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2015 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a sketch of end of muntin. I revised the picture - the muntin is one piece. It was so worn and the hole from the brads made it look like the rib was set in a groove, but it is not. So i will practice on scrap first and see how it goes.


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Last edited by JulieL on Tue Oct 27, 2015 7:48 am; edited 1 time in total
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johnleeke
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2015 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(Your sketch shows a joint within the muntin. What is that? It looks as if a rib has been replaced. Is that it? If so, I may have to rethink the following, which assumes each muntin is a single solid piece of wood.)



I think a long stainless steel "sheetrock style" screw would work here.
If the meeting rail is 1" thick (vertical measurement) then the screw could be 3" long.

The important skill with this method is drilling the holes in the rail so that they are in "perfect" alignment with the axis of the muntins and located in the middle of the muntin where there is the most wood. I "eyeball" this and usually get it good enough. You might want to practice this on an old sash, or with a moch-up.

Procedure

1. Remove glass & brads. (already done?)

2. Clean out the joints, with all surfaces down to bare wood.

3. Make sure all wood around the joints is sound, if not, repair.

4. Gently clamp the rail back into position. This would take two or three clamps. Align the muntins with the rail, checking to make sure the glass will fit in the lights.

5. Test your screw size and drill sizes on one joint first. Pre-drill a shank hole in the rail, that is equal to the major diameter of the screw threads. Pre-drill a pilot hole into the end of the muntin that is equal to, or slightly larger than the minor diameter of the screw threads and drill in depth to the length of the screw. Then gently begin screwing in the screw. The test here is to determine if you have the right pilot hole diameter. If the diameter is too small the threads of the screw may split the end of the muntin. If the diameter is too large there will not be enough wood for the threads to grip into. If the muntin begins to split as you begin to screw it in, take out the screw and drill the pilot hole just slightly larger. If the screw goes in with no splitting, then you should be ready to go with this size screw and drill bits on the other joints.

6. Pre-drill the shank holes and pilot holes for the other joints.

7. If you are adding glue to the joints, take out the screw, and loosen the clamps to allow the joints to open up just a bit. Apply the glue to both internal butt-joint surfaces. Start the screws into the rail, so the tips of the screws come out the top surface of the rail a bit, so the tips can align with the pilot holes in the ends of the muntins. Gently tighten up the clamps, checking for alignment of the tips of the screws and pilot holes as the joints close.

8. Gently screw the screws into the ends of the muntins.

9. If using glue, let it dry before removing the clamps.

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2016 10:10 pm    Post subject: Sash work Reply with quote

As part of National Preservation Month, some folks have started a [National] SASH REVIVAL DAY. Historic Albany Foundation participated by hosting a bring your own sash event: work on your sash, share tips, and enjoy the comraderie. A great idea!

I removed the hard, broken putty first and learned that I did not need to remove the glass and take that added risk of breaking the glass. A big beautiful wavy pane. The fit was so tight, and the pane still bedded so that I could just reglaze. I finished stripping off the old paint and doing the new glazing back at home. Getting faster - did all that in an afternoon.



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I usually pack the putty in with my fingers, but I was taking pictures so used a putty knife here. Using Sarco which is my favorite. The let it sit for a bit before finishing it off.
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Here's glazing the way John teaches it, one clean sweep that keeps the putty off the glass - so efficient. (then follow up with whiting to clean off the oil.) I love glazing this way. Working on an easel for this, easiest for glazing and painting.
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That's how it looked at the end of the day. Will leave the glaze to dry for awhile, then use consolidant and epoxy to fill the cleaned out cracks, then prime and paint. The interior is varnished so that is the brown line you see behind the glass. (And the
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Last edited by JulieL on Wed May 18, 2016 9:05 pm; edited 2 times in total
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SashGuy



Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 152
Location: Houston

PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2016 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Julie,

The rail checking at the rail/stile join? If you thumb in a bit of Sarco and smooth, you'll help prevent future absorption.

George
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2016 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

End-edge tooling. Excellent! Julie, you are my best trainee.
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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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JulieL



Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 51
Location: Albany NY

PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 11:29 am    Post subject: team work Reply with quote

Helping a friend restore her 12 over 12 sash in her early 1800's home in upstate NY. Most of the sash are newer construction with salvaged wavy panes, but some are the originals which are really difficult to glaze as there is so little room for putty. And our points were too big (need to get one of the point guns for the little jobbers). And check out the interior lathing - she does plastering too but has kept this wall open for viewing for now.


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