Where to Purchase Restoration Glass
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SoulEffigy



Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 3:38 pm    Post subject: Where to Purchase Restoration Glass Reply with quote

Anyone know any good sources for purchasing restoration glass? I checked out Bendheim Restoration Glass online but was wondering if anyone knows of any cheaper outlets? I am specifically looking at the "light" restoration glass for an 1830 home. Thanks!
~Lucy
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Jeremy Ballard



Joined: 22 Mar 2008
Posts: 127
Location: Providence, RI and Cape Cod, MA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been going to my "local" architectural salvage yard and buying old sash with the glass I'm looking for. Even with the labor to remove the glass it's still cheaper then new. It's a shame to break the old frames but in reality 99% of that room full of sash they have will never see the light of day again. I try to find sash that has the glazing mostly falling off to make removal easier. One could argue that I'm recycling too.
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Heritage Restoration, Inc.
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sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 568
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depending on how much your looking for---I would also check at local glass companies. Especially the older smaller shops. They usually have a selection of older glass. You might have to sort through what they have (if they'll let you).

Our local glass shop has a nice selection of about every period type of restoration glass. Of course they don't have a whole lot of any one period type.

I had a customer that traveled all over Northern Indiana stopping at glass shops looking for just the right wavyness to match what she had in some of her sashes. I remember her coming into my driveway (my shop was in my garage at that time) honking her horn with a big smile on her face. "I found some, I found some" she would say as she opened the back door of her Taurus. Of course I'd have to stop what ever I was doing and help her sort through her find. "That a good one, and another. No, that won't do. I hope their big enough" she would say.

That lady was a dedicated passionate glass finder. And to top it all off, I got to keep all the glass that didn't pass her rigid specifications.

I remember when I finished installing the sashes in the Bay window area for her. It was late in the afternoon and the sun was shining through her newly restored windows with the ultra wavy, pitted and bubbled glass. She leaned against the wall and said
"My Lord thats a pretty picture!"

I thought it was pretty cool too.

Steve S
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Kate



Joined: 07 Mar 2007
Posts: 32
Location: Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Jeremy that the best source of old glass is an architectural salvage place. I hit the mother lode at my local salvage place a few years ago when they had a dozen old storm windows with beautiful wavy 16"x 30" panes and old crumbly putty that fell out at the slightest touch. I only had to remove the glazing pins to get the glass out. I got the whole lot for $8.

One thing you should bear in mind is that some old glass, and new restoration glass too, can have a greenish tinge. This isn't usually noticeable, and it can be quite beautiful. But when you mix glass from different sources within a window, you should make sure all the pieces are the same color, or lack thereof.

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~~ Vinyl is for records, not windows. ~~
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sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 568
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The greenish tinge is easily detectable by looking at the cut edges. It'll show there more readily than looking through it.

Except of course when a greenish tinge does slips through, is installed and your looking at the windows from the street and the green one stands out proud next to all the sashes with clear glass.



Steve S
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Sean



Joined: 27 Dec 2006
Posts: 170
Location: Salem, MA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2009 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a place in Peabody, MA, on Walnut St. called Shards. They do wavy restoration glass. Lots of houses around here (Salem) have it, including next door to me. Looks nice, like late 19th century stuff, with light ripples. Don't know prices.

I've yet to hear of anyone who does crown glass. There are on or two places in England that make new crown glass, but I don't know much about them or if they deal with the states.
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rncx



Joined: 21 Jun 2008
Posts: 660
Location: Little Rock, AR

PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 2:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

since i'm in the process of building a house full of windows, i bought a crate from hollander glass in houston last time i went looking for glass.

that was sixty 40x60 inch sheets. their price on that quantity was 4.15 per square foot if i remember correctly.

they did say that they would sell in small quantities if people requested it, but the price would surely be higher.

call them and ask for pierre, he'll send you a price list.

they were the least expensive of several glass supply places i checked with.

i agree that if you only need small quantities, the salvage yards are probably your best bet.
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SoulEffigy



Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Everyone,
Thanks so much for posting back to my question! I really appreciate all the ideas and advice. I will definitely check into salvage yards. I am in CT...hopefully there are some good ones. =) Thanks again!
=)
Lucy
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Vic



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 59
Location: NYC

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 9:30 pm    Post subject: restoration glass Reply with quote

Bendheim is the North American importer/distributor for the light restoration glass made by Lamberts.Rainbow Art Glass in NJ imports restoration glass made by St. Just. I doubt that you will find "salvage" glass that looks like "light restoration"glass. Both the Lamberts and the St. Just glass is VERY clear. If you want soft waves in a slightly green cast, look at "restover" by Schott. Sunshine Glass in Buffalo sells it
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jade



Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 786
Location: Hawley MA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 5:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'm thinking i must have close to a ton of old salvaged glass in the shop...we mark its dimensions and appearance before storage...we've got stuff that looks almost flat, some wavy without seeds or striations, some that can make you dizzy if you stare too long and other more precious glass that is razor thin and full of entertaining seeds, lines, ripples, curves and puddles...
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rncx



Joined: 21 Jun 2008
Posts: 660
Location: Little Rock, AR

PostPosted: Sun Sep 06, 2009 11:30 am    Post subject: Re: restoration glass Reply with quote

Vic wrote:
Bendheim is the North American importer/distributor for the light restoration glass made by Lamberts.Rainbow Art Glass in NJ imports restoration glass made by St. Just. I doubt that you will find "salvage" glass that looks like "light restoration"glass. Both the Lamberts and the St. Just glass is VERY clear. If you want soft waves in a slightly green cast, look at "restover" by Schott. Sunshine Glass in Buffalo sells it


restover is what i'm using. it doesn't have bubbles and other defects associated with hand blown glass, but the slight wave is authentic to the naked eye, and i prefer the greenish tint.
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Tim Storey



Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 144
Location: NW Indiana

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've noticed that some newer storm windows have at least somewhat wavy glass. It seems like it could be used in some cases, not for the pickiest, but I don't know much about it. I suppose there's plenty of true, salvaged glass, but I was just curious. I'm also curious about why the waviness (not ripples, more like warpage) occurs in these modern storm windows -I know how it occurs in vintage windows.
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Vic



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 59
Location: NYC

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 9:21 pm    Post subject: Re: restoration glass Reply with quote

rncx wrote:
Vic wrote:
Bendheim is the North American importer/distributor for the light restoration glass made by Lamberts.Rainbow Art Glass in NJ imports restoration glass made by St. Just. I doubt that you will find "salvage" glass that looks like "light restoration"glass. Both the Lamberts and the St. Just glass is VERY clear. If you want soft waves in a slightly green cast, look at "restover" by Schott. Sunshine Glass in Buffalo sells it


restover is what i'm using. it doesn't have bubbles and other defects associated with hand blown glass, but the slight wave is authentic to the naked eye, and i prefer the greenish tint.


By the turn of the last century most window glass was made by the ":drawn" method. Thus the slight waviness, minimal bubbles (called seeds) as opposed to the more distorted and seedy glass made by blowing, this glass is refered to as cylinder glass.
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sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 568
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tim,

Usually, the newer storm window glass is only single strength or very thin.(I'm thinking about 3/32") Most prime double hung windows are double strength.(1/8") Even the older glass is mostly double strength. I say mostly cuz the thickness of older glass isss variable.

The bigger the glass the more the thickness (weight) is important. Using single strength in a double hung may even affect how the counter balance weights operate to keep the sash at the desired height.

Though you'd want to know!

Steve S.
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rncx



Joined: 21 Jun 2008
Posts: 660
Location: Little Rock, AR

PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sschoberg wrote:
Tim,

The bigger the glass the more the thickness (weight) is important. Using single strength in a double hung may even affect how the counter balance weights operate to keep the sash at the desired height.

Though you'd want to know!

Steve S.


indeed it does ;).

on two of my original windows upstairs, i had original weights. the old glass was 1/8", the new glass 3/32". i had to cut about 3 inches from each weight to properly balance them again.
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