Is oil based exterior paint going the way of the dinosaur?
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Beth



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 3
Location: Central NY

PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:03 pm    Post subject: Is oil based exterior paint going the way of the dinosaur? Reply with quote

Hello everyone,

I have been told by 3 fairly credible sources that production of oil based exterior paint was discontinued at the beginning of this year. Yet when we talked to our local Benjamin Moore dealer, we got two different answers. One salesman said maybe but he felt that it would still be available in some form because there was a demand for it. Another said it wasn't being discontinued.

Does anyone know the real deal? We really need the correct answer because we are half-way through painting the trim on our old house. The weather was very rainy last summer and the painter was very thorough but very slow. We bought a number of gallons of paint to stock up and have been promised more primer when it comes in but I am getting nervous. I did several internet searchs to see if I could find the answer but without luck but I am not that great at the internet.

If it is being discontinued, will that include porch and floor enamel too? What is the general opinion of latex paint? Especially over oil paint?

Thanks, Beth
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2978
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jan 09, 2005 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The trend of the past decade of fewer and fewer oil-based paint products will continue, perhaps at an excellerating rate. Manufacturers are dropping oil-based products in part to meet enviornmental regulations; but, I think, mostly because it is less costly to make paint with water than with solvents. However, there will always be some oil-based products to meet specific needs and, like your dealer says, because there will always be some demand.

It could be that the specific paint product you have been using will be dropped this year. Let us know what product and manufacturer you are using and we will check into it for you.

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
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Beth



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 3
Location: Central NY

PostPosted: Sun Jan 09, 2005 10:15 pm    Post subject: Oil based paint Reply with quote

John,
Thanks for the info. I braved the cobwebs in the cellar :) and found out the names of the paint. We have been using Benjamin Moore Alkyd Fresh Start penetrating primer and Benjamin Moore Alkyd High Gloss Trim Paint Brilliant White. The house is brick and we are just doing the trim.

I know white wasn't the original trim color, it was dark brown and sometime later dark green, then white before we moved in and painted it white again. This is our second painting in 25 years. The house is Second Empire/Italianate with very deep eaves which protects the paint. Good thing, the trim is really high up!

White for me is a better color at this time in the life of the house, the brick is darker than originally and we are surrounded by large trees which make the house dark. An interesting bit of information regarding the porch ceilings: ours were not light blue but peach when the trim was brown and mint green when the trim was green. I stripped alot of paint with my heat plate the first time around and found the colors.
Thanks, Beth
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2978
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 10, 2005 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today I talked with, Carl Minchew, a Benjamin Moore technical specialist, who said that this year several states were changing their enviornmental protection regulations in response to new federal regulations. After many years of reducing VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) in industrial and auto emissions, and producing low-VOC paints, they are now tightening up control of many consumer products and that includes residential house paint. California and several eastern states are beginning to reduce the VOCs allowed so low that paint companies are responding by taking certian oil-based products with VOCs off the market.

Paint products manufactured to the old VOC levels before the first of this year can still be sold, so yours may still be available.

I also talked with the Benjamin Moore Customer Service, Product Informaion Center (888 236-6667). The speciaist there gave me the following status on these products:

Alkyd Fresh Start penetrating primer (#100-00) continues to be available at this time

House & Trim Paint (#130) is available, but only in quart containers

If these are not your specific products, call the Product Information Center with your product numbers to check their availablility in your state.

Can you send us a picture or two of your paint project? If so, send them by email attachment to: JohnLeeke@HistoricHomeWorks.com

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John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Sun Jul 03, 2005 4:26 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Beth



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 3
Location: Central NY

PostPosted: Mon Jan 10, 2005 8:02 pm    Post subject: Thanks for the info. Reply with quote

John,
Thanks for the information on the paint. I guess we had better go back and get more paint. We bought 4 gallons ahead but it really is hard to estimate how much we will need. My husband said that they had a lot more on the shelf. In the future, maybe we will have to drive to another state to get what we need if they don't have it here in Central New York. :) I'll call customer service. I should have thought of that. Feel like a dummy. I'll send a picture when I can.
Your window seminar in June looks interesting. Stripping, painting and reglazing (or is it reputty-ing) all of our 37 double hung windows is my goal for next summer. I've done it before with mixed results but only a few rooms at a time. I would like to weatherstrip too. Fortunately or unfortunately we don't have the small lites but when you crack the glass trying to get the old putty out, it means a trip to the hardware store, $30 out of your wallet and a cranky salesperson because they don't like to do the big panes with the arched tops. My record so far is cracking 1 for every 3 I do, so that would be about 25 cracked sash. I better get better at it!
Again thanks now and in the past with Dave's house. Beth
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BLUES



Joined: 26 Jan 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
I'm new at this and don't know if I'm doing this correctly. But, here goes.
We bought a 111 year old home 4 years ago and I am concerned that the oil-based paint we used will be impossible to cover in the future without an astronomical amount of money to prep for the latex or whatever will be out there to use then. The interior trim in the house is also painted with an oil based paint. All wood work in this house was painted with oil based paints for years, from what we understand. Is there a product to use to prep the oil-based painted surface before painting with a latex? If not, what are all the people going to do with older home that are painted with oil based paints? My home is large and all the exterior is wood.
Thank you,
Blues
________
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Last edited by BLUES on Wed Feb 23, 2011 4:32 pm; edited 1 time in total
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J. Dunson Todd



Joined: 25 Jan 2005
Posts: 9
Location: Maine

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 9:28 am    Post subject: oil based paint Reply with quote

It seems that there is a loop hole which i believe John mentioned regarding specialty primers in the new VOC regulations regarding oil based products. any stain blocking primers witin the allowable limits (350 gm/L of VOC) will be allowed. there is also a "touch up" loophole which allows for non compliant coatings to be sold in quart size packaging, as well as areosols. This may be valuable to BLUES concern reagarding oil paints at least for interior work. I would assume that a good quality acrylic latex could work as a top coat, but painting is not my niche. There is an extensive article on this issue in the trade mag. Journal of Light Construction Jan 2005
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2978
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dunson is right. I believe we will still have reasonable quality oil-based primer for spot paint maintenance on our old houses for the next few years, and can use 100% acrylics for the top coats.

I spotted the Journal of Light Construction article too. It is an excellent description of the developing VOC/oil-based availability situation.

Also, see my article in the Historic HomeWorks Library, Q&A series, Peeling Paint Looks Shabby, which tells the whole story of how to deal with the heavy paint buildup. See it at:

http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/qa/qa07.htm

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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BLUES



Joined: 26 Jan 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2005 3:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you so much for all the information about my problem. I feel somewhat relieved after reading your replies. Hope to be able to locate the magazine and store for future use. Thanks again.
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Last edited by BLUES on Wed Feb 23, 2011 4:32 pm; edited 1 time in total
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2978
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2005 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the latest from the Washington Post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/05/23/AR2005052301644.html

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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AZOdiy



Joined: 28 May 2009
Posts: 15
Location: Michigan

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If oil-based paint is going away, what's happening to oil-based primer? I'm very worried about finding the right primer, because we're going to wash walls next week, let things dry, then prime the whole house. On another thread, I've posted pictures of the original paint job. Apparently, nobody repainted between the original 1896 paint job and the application of asbestos-cement siding sometime before 1950. We've been told we have to use an oil-based primer before applying acrylic paint top coats. I've read for hours on end to use a "high quality" oil primer, but except for references to Sherwin-Williams A-100 (which is phased out), there is absolutely nothing online to suggest which ones are "high quality". I've found price is no guarantee of quality, but the Benjamin Moore and S-W people are eager to sell $45/gallon primer. The next stop is Glidden or Zinsser. We're running out of time. Please comment.
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sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 568
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We're using A100 primer almost exclusively, with no problems with availability. The quality is good, but with any primer your prep work is important.

It is comparable with Ben Moore slow primer, which we use also.

Oil primers are pretty much the standard for exterior priming.

Steve S
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AZOdiy



Joined: 28 May 2009
Posts: 15
Location: Michigan

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guess I'll have to hit Indiana or Illinois to find it. The S-W folks in Kalamazoo alleged A-100 primer is no longer being made, and they're sold out.
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sschoberg



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 568
Location: Plymouth, Indiana

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And I may have to eat my words---I am at our shop now and went to grab the primer can to prime a door that I've restored and there was no A100 to be had in the shop.

I used primer out of a Sherwin Williams pink can that said it was an oil based primer.

I just talked with our Sherwin Williams store about availability of A100.
Per Andrew, Sherwin Williams changed the formula and renamed it to conform to the new VOC regulations taking into affect in 2010.

He's faxing me the Spec data sheet for it sometime today and said I'll see when I compare it to the old A100 that its almost identical to the new stuff.

The new multi-purpose oil primer is an Alkyd but with lower VOC mineral spirits than A100. And he added it is more user friendly. I would bet its more expensive also. Other then that he said we shouldn't see a difference.

I tried to find an invoice to see what we're paying for the new stuff, but if I spend too much time in our files I get a headache, and who wants that on a beautifull day like today.

So, you were right---no more A100 oil primer, but no plans by Sherwin Williams to stop making oil paint and primers.

As for the quality of the new primer--time will tell!

I'll call our Ben Moore supplier on Monday to if they've changed their formula in their Alkyde primer also.

Steve S
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TDL



Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Posts: 253

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here in PA I can buy Ben Moore oil primer but not paint. If I want oil paint I have to buy paint for metal. My dealer told me it would work fine but I never tried it. Not sure if anything is changing for 2010.
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