parting bead
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jomercer



Joined: 30 Aug 2006
Posts: 28
Location: MARYLAND

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 9:16 am    Post subject: parting bead Reply with quote

AS I've been removing the parting beads, I have found httat many of them were split by nails driven through them, or rotted at the bottom ends or so dried out that I mostly extract splintery pieces. The top strip on the interior is the only one I can consistently get out intact.

So I started calling around to get some parting bead...none of the lumber yards claimed to know what I was talking about. One local molding company insisted they needed a profile faxed to them before they could quote a price (!) despite my description of the bead as a 1/2" x 7/8" rectangular profile.

Finally, after I dutifully drew a rectangle on a piece of papaer and faxed it to them, did they respond:

$0.97 per foot before sales tax, if I bought all at once the 275 feet I will ultimately need.

Sounds a bit steep to me, but what do you think? I don't seem to have much choice.....
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2958
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plain rectangular parting beads can be made with with a high level of skill and knowledge on a table saw. Just last week I made sixteen 5' beads for my friend and colleague, Janet. I didn't charge her, but let's consider the costs of this work. That's 160 lin.ft.. I used 5 board feet of clear pine, say $4/bd.ft., $20 in materials. It took about 40 minutes. Most woodworking shops have at least a one-hour minimum (if they'll even consider a small job like this), and might charge $60-90 per hour. So total costs would have been $80 to $110, or $.57 to $.69 per lin. ft. If I had made parting beads for a whole hour I might have made 320 lin.ft. for a total cost of $.25 to $.35 per lin. ft.

While their pricing is in the right ball park, it looks like your sense about their cost looking high is right on, however we can assume that they know their business and their costs, that if they cut the order wrong they would re-do it, etc. That's why they insisted on a measured drawing--in fact, since the fit of parting beads is critical I would not do it by drawing and measurement, but woud at least send two or three samples of the original bead, and specify "same exact size to match sample, plus or minus .01 inches." If they can't measure their work to .01" then they may not be able to make parting beads for an accurate enough fit.

Quote:
I don't seem to have much choice.....


Seek a local woodworking shop that can do accurate table saw work and has workers who are knowledgable enough to select suitable straight-grained stock to work with.

-or-

Consider doing it yourself. That $267 would make a nice down payment on a pretty good table saw.

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
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emrude



Joined: 21 Aug 2006
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here in St. Louis you can still get trim that is the same size as parting stop at some hardware stores and a few real lumberyards. Can I ask if you are removing both sides of parting bead? I mostly just remove one side so I can get top window out.
I make my parting bead from cypress. A lot of windows around here have "beaded" parting stop. I mill this by hand and that costs extra.

Marion
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jomercer



Joined: 30 Aug 2006
Posts: 28
Location: MARYLAND

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John,

What size lumber did you start with--I have a nice table saw.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I started with a 7/8" thick board, but you can start with any board that is at least as thick as your narrowest dimention. See my Exterior Woodwork Details report for a section on selecting boards and making wooden parts:

http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/reports/reports.htm#Woodwork

See photos below for my bead sawing method.

A little story is in order.

When I was twelve my dad said I could run the table saw when my belly buttom was up to the table. I bet I checked my belly button up to that table at least twice a month that first year. After that I saw it would be a while so I only checked once a year. After a few years of that I just gave up, in the mean time I learned a lot about hand-sawing. When I was sixteen dad reminded me to check my belly button up to the saw, and what do you know, I was old enough to use the saw. The first thing he taught me about the saw was how to count my fingers. You know 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Yep, I hand to count them every time, before I turned on that switch. So, he would stand there and watch me count my fingers. Then he woud ask me, "Which finger could you do without, if you sawed it off with that saw?" I think about it and say, "how about my little finger," while I wiggled it--doink, doink, doink. Then he'd say, "well, without your little finger, what are you going to pick you nose with?" OK, ok. He had a different come back for every finger. Of course the lesson was "Count Your Fingers, You Need Every One of Them." Four decades later and I still count my fingers.

So, before you make your parting beads, Count Your Fingers !

John (he's still got all ten) Leeke



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historypaul



Joined: 30 Sep 2006
Posts: 8
Location: Midwest

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 1:07 pm    Post subject: Parting "bead" availability Reply with quote

I'm surprised that you're all having such a hard time finding parting bead. Here in the midwest, we call it parting stop, and it seems to be available almost anywhere in w. pine. We don't install it until we've treated it with a preservative, such as bora-care in our work.

While the poor quality of the new-growth w. pine makes for a pretty crooked moulding, because its such a small moulding, it can be installed straight, then tacked into place if necessary.

It's also a standard 1/2" x 3/4", since nominal sizes for 4/4 nowadays is 3/4". If you need a 7/8" or larger, you'll still have to make it yourself. Finding clear pine thicker than 3/4" would be the challenge out here. Even the lumberyards don't carry that out here. I would just tell the shop foreman to haul out another old w. pine barn timber, and start resawing... Isn't that what everybody does? :)

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jomercer



Joined: 30 Aug 2006
Posts: 28
Location: MARYLAND

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm from the Midwest, but here in the mid-Atlantic, there doesn't seem to be much available of a lot of things to be had.

I've been taking them all out because they and their associated sashes are so gooped up with alligatored/checked/flaking paint, varnish, rotted at the (usually bottom ends), full of nails, etc. that the parting strips aren't worth trying to scrape/strip clean enough to get a new start. Some have been pieced together from shorter sizes, too.

My POs must have had stock in a nail company (or at least worked at one in order to spirit away a handy supply)--their solution for anything that didn't function correctly was to find a huge common nail and pound the hell out of it.
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historypaul



Joined: 30 Sep 2006
Posts: 8
Location: Midwest

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:00 pm    Post subject: Parting stop Reply with quote

I agree with you. We don't ever save the parting stop. I've been meticulously removing trim for over a decade and I still have a hard time removing parting stop without breaking it. And the cost to strip it vs. the ease of making a square moulding is prohibitive.

I would caution against using new growth wood without treating it with a preservative, though. We have the luxury of using reclaimed old growth lumber, which we still pretreat as a matter of course.

Just an aside... If anybody here goes the table saw route, we like to use a "glue line rip" blade to cut parting stop. With a good fluid motion through the saw, you can avoid blade marks. Keep it moving, though or it will burn.

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