Sash light configurations
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briangorman



Joined: 03 Oct 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 9:00 am    Post subject: Sash light configurations Reply with quote

I am the owner of an historic home that I believe to have been built in 1802. I think that many of the original window frames and trim are still in place - filled with vinyl inserts some years back. I have found a few 12/12 sash that fit some of the front windows but don't know the configuration of the sash for other windows of different dimensions. Is there a way to tell what the original sash configurations and pane measurements were by the dimensions of the interior window framing?

I'd appreciate any recommendations about shaper cutter suppliers who might supply profiles for early sash components too.

Thanks.

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emrude



Joined: 21 Aug 2006
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sash was made with sash planes. You can find old planes on e-bay. Router bits and shaper profiles for older windows are very few in number. You can modify a steel router bits and match some old profiles. Or if you have moulder(like Williams and Hussey) you can have profile matched, but the cope would have to be cut by hand.
John has great write up in Save your Windows and I'm sure he has many more tips.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All the measurements for sashes and the surrounding window frame were based on the size of the glass panes, which were somewhat standardized, usually on whole inches. Common sizes were 5x7, 6x8, 8x10, 8x12, 10x16 etc. Look around your town and county for houses of similar age and type that still have their original sashes (often found in attic windows, or stacked up in the back shed or barn loft) and measure the sizes of the glass panes. Your panes may have been the same.

Measure the width of the sash opening in your window, and layout cardboards cut to pane sizes on a table to find the number and arrangement of "panes" that will fill that opening, leaving gaps for the sash parts between the "panes." This is how the windows were originally sized, and is often the easiest way to design a custom replacement sash.

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briangorman



Joined: 03 Oct 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks John & EM. I used the measurements of the 12/12 (9X7 lights)sash's rails, stiles & muntins to lay out a sort of matrix with potential height and width given different pane sizes. Nothing seems to fit just right. I end up with either 9X8 lights in a 9/6 configuration (2" too short) or 8X6 in a 12/12 configuration (1-1/2 " tall, 5/8" wide). The first seems odd to me; the second, too big. I have 3 questions. Do either of these seem more likely? Would the dimensions of the sash components be markedly different for a slightly smaller window...or if the windows I am trying to recreate were earlier than the (early 1800's 9X7, 12/12) sash I am using as a model? (the 12/12 may be from an early renovation)

Thanks.

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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brian:

OK, you method of using the existing sash for wood part sizing is excellent and is leading you to the answers.

The window sizing methods used in the past vary greatly from region to region. The answers you questions are right there in your town or county. Go measure some other windows in town, to see how the window makers of the past resolved these issues. Maybe they used odd-sized glass, or perhaps your windows are the odd ones, different than the rest.

(you see, we don't have the answers, but this is the method to find the answers.)

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oldhomeowner



Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 55
Location: albany NY

PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This may be too obvious but I might check with the historical society in town. They may have pictures of the house or know of where such pictures might be. Even at a distance, pictures would help with knowing the design of the original windows. And after ascertaining historical accuracy for type of house, style, etc., you could make whatever works. I have noticed the wide variety of window framing styles in this area on historic houses of similar vintage and suspect yours might be unique to the house.
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