Window Workshop Plan
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2944
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 11:48 am    Post subject: Window Workshop Plan Reply with quote

(Plan Version: 1.4, Update: 2/16/07, New: Assistant, Trainee selection)

The workshop is now "sold out" and registration is closed. Selection of trainees is the next step in planning. See "Schedule" below.


W01 Repairing Wood Windows A Master Class

Wed, 3/7/07, 9:am-5:pm, full day workshop, training, master class.
TB website announcement:
http://www.traditionalbuildingshow.com/RandR/event/Boston2007/Wed.shtml
Register for the workshop here:
http://www.traditionalbuildingshow.com/RandR/RandR_Reg/reg_forms/form2.html)


Following is the proposal submitted to Judy Hayward, the conference organizer. It has been accepted by her and the conference. As we l develop our detailed plan for the workshop I will revise and update this message. Please give this some study and post your comments and questions.

TRADITIONAL BUILDING CONFERENCE
Entry Proposal Form

Name of Submitting Presenter: John Leeke

Title: American Preservationeer

Organization: John Leekes Historic HomeWorks

Address: 26 Higgins St.

City: Portland ME04103

Phone: 207 773-2306

Email Address: johnleeke@historichomeworks.com

Proposed Presentation Title: Save Your Wood Windows

Target Audience (check all that apply):

X Architects
X Conservators
X Contractors/Trades
X Property Owners/Mgrs.
X Other: DIY Homeowners

Level of Understanding Required for Content:

X Intermediate (Some experience; general to specific content)

X Advanced (Narrow focus for seasoned practitioners)

Length of Proposed Session:
X two 3.5-hour sessions on the same day

Instructional Format (check all that apply):
X Demonstration
X Other: hands-on experience

Audio-Visual Requirements (please check all that apply and note if more than one is needed):

X Slide Projector
X Paper Flip Pad
Microphone: must have Lapel, wireless

Is there recommended reading in advance of your presentation?
All handouts will be posted at the Historic HomeWorks website: www.HistoricHomeWorks.com for advance reading and study.

What are the top three (3) to five (5) things the audience should know - be able to do - after attending your session?

1. How to do window work using Lead-Safe methods.

2. How to quickly and inexpensively stabilize a window to limit deterioration until more effective repairs and maintenance can be done.

3. The four most commonly needed maintenance and repair methods for wood windows, A. Paint and putty maintenance; B. Repair exterior wood sill weather checks; C. Sash joint repairs; D. Glass repair and replacement

4. How to upgrade the thermal and comfort performance of traditional wood windows to meet or exceed the performance of cheap vinyl replacement windows.

Brief Description of Proposed Presentation (75-100 words to be used as a basis for promotional copy):

Why do so many good old windows end up in the dumpster? Because the building construction industry can make more money selling us cheap plastic imitations. The field of historic preservation provides us with the alternative: knowledgeable tradespeople who know how to maintain and repair windows. Tradespeople and advanced do-it-yourselfers will use and learn the specific methods and procedures that have been proven effective over the past three decades. They will work with traditional materials like linseed oil putty and old-growth pine, as well as the newest methods such as wood-epoxy repairs and portable steam deglazing. Your instructor, John Leeke, has been working on older buildings and their windows for four decades and has been training window workers for more than ten years. He will be assisted by trained and experienced historic window specialists, Jade Mortimer and Steve Swiat from the Window Preservation Alliance.

Content: This workshop is not everything about windows. The demonstrations and training will focus specifically on the few most common and needed maintenance methods, repair procedures and treatment strategies. Specific methods are likely to include A. Paint and putty maintenance; B. Repair exterior wood sill weather checks; C. Sash joint repairs; D. Glass repair and replacement. Actual methods used will be determined two weeks before the workshop and will be based in part on the needs of the trainees.

Format: This workshop is organized as a master class with trainees and observers. 8-10 trainees will work, hands-on, with the special tools and materials with direct training from the instructor and guidance from the assistants. Another 30 to 40 observers will be accepted who can watch the training, take notes and photos, and participate in question & answer sessions. There will be two 3hr. 15min. sessions with a break in between for lunch and discussion.

Follow Up and Continuing Support: John Leeke will provide ongoing support for workshop participants for a period of three months after the workshop. This will be provided online over the internet with a pro-active discussion forum that includes text and digital photos, and a monthly online live video conference. (see examples at www.HistoricHomeWorks.com).


Human Resources:

1 instructor, John Leeke

3 assistants

Steve Swiat, Workshop Assistant, Northwood Restoration Shop, Getzville, NY

Jade Mortimer, Workshop Associate, Heartwood Building & Restoration, Hawley, MA

Ricky Peterson, Workshop Assistant, preservation tradesman, Ipswich, MA



30-40 observers
(to be an observer, register for the workshop here:
http://www.traditionalbuildingshow.com/RandR/RandR_Reg/reg_forms/form2.html)

8-10 trainees
(trainees are pre-selected from those who register as observers. Register by Feb.15 and send me email johnleeke@historichomeworks.com to assure your consideration as a trainee)




Workspace:

length: 58' 8 ''
width 30 ' 4 "
Ceiling height: 18 feet 11"

Floor: A hard cleanable surface like concrete, asphalt tile, hardboard or plywood is preferable. We need to rethink the plan to cover a carpet floor entirely with 6-mil poly sheeting, because this will be a difficult surface for seating observers and difficult for our lead-safe work method of 8x10 6-mil floor containments for specific tasks, which would result in two layers of poly that can be a slip hazard. If we must work on carpet, I'd rather have no overall floor covering, our usual poly containments and an assistant standing by throughout the day with simple cleaning tools to catch up with anything that escapes the containments (very little).


Seating: Chairs and 2x6 tables for observers.

Handouts: two 2x6 tables

Work tables: seven 3x7 sturdy folding tables for work operations; no table covers or skirts, we will provide our own poly and fabric dropcloth table covers.

Arrangements: By 3:00pm the day before the workshop we need the floor protection down, all chairs in stacks lined up one-deep against one wall. All tables open and set up against the opposite wall, with the 2 observer tables lined up next to the wall, one deep, then all 3 work tables lined up one deep against the 2 tables.

Access to workshop space: At 12:00pm the day before the workshop we will start moving our equipment to the hall outside the room, at 3:00pm we will move our equipment into the room and begin setup

Setup: workstations set up will be 10' wide down the middle of the room, with space for observation all around, chairs for observers needed, but the observers will move their seating, standing, as needed during the day, etc.

4 to 6 workstations
2 glazing, 3 woodwork (sash joint repair traditional & wood-epoxy repair), weather-check repair w/epoxy, 1 portable steam deglazing (brief, at beginning of day) 1 painting

Breakdown, Clearout & Cleanup: We will need three hours after the close of the workshop to clear the room. Heavy equipment and materials(benches, sash easels, windows, sashes, etc.) will go directly to the exhibit floor demonstration area for use by the Window Preservation Alliance. Small tools and valuables will go to our vehicles or lodgings.

Schedule:

Feb.20 Selection of Trainees

Feb.25 All Trainees need to be in touch with Leeke by phone 207 773-2306 or email JohnLeeke@HistoricHomeWorks.com for pre-workshop assignments

March.Tues.6 9:00am
Leeke leaves Portland, ME, traveling to Boston, Hines Conference Center,

Tues6 12:00. Assistant, Ricky Peterson, to meet Leeke at Hines Conference Center, Cambria Street loading dock, POV lane.

Ricky, park your vehicle before hand, and come to the POV lane on foot, at 12:00 noon sharp. Bring a hand-truck/dolly if you have one.

Tues.6 12:00-3:00pm
Leeke arrives at conference center; Cambria Street loading dock, take the POV lane, must unload truck within 20 minutes; then moving goods to hallway near Room 202 (get floor plan of center)

Tues.6 3:00pm-5:00pm
classroom open, moving goods into classroom & begin setup

Wed.7 8:00-9:00am
Leeke & Assistants prepare for workshop at Rm.202

Wed.7 8:30am
Trainees arrived at Rm.202 by 8:30 at the latest

Wed.7 8:00-8:45am
Observers arriving at Rm.202

Wed.7 9:00am - 12:00pm 1st Work Session

Lunch

Wed.7 1:00-5:00pm 2nd Work Session

Wed.7 5:00-7:00pm
Leeke & Assistants Pick up, Pack up, Cleared out by 7:00pm


...schedule to be continued...



(please leave your questions and comments by clicking "Post Reply" below.)

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Fri Mar 02, 2007 7:18 am; edited 21 times in total
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jade



Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 785
Location: Hawley MA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

john.....
very thorough....i can't think of anything to add...
one observation...you refer to the putty as 'linseed oil putty' when indeed it is more like 70% soy oil and 30% linseed....

will steve and i be working in both workshops or one each?
i can tell you i will have some difficulty in dressing for 'john leeke's lead safe operations'...i don't wear a respirator or tyvek.....we'll need to discuss my involvement there.....

if i receive one more fax or mailing from this convention i think i'll scream!!!

.....jade
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2944
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jade:

The mention of "linseed oil putty" does not limit us to only that. In fact, the plan is to have on hand at least two products in each of the three categories of glazing compounds, including ingredient like linseed, soy, safflower, etc..

This is why you will be a good associate at the workshop, you know which product has soy. (now where is that recipe for tofu paint?)

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John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Sat Jan 20, 2007 10:44 am; edited 1 time in total
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johnleeke
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2007 10:41 am    Post subject: Putty Reply with quote

More on putty for the workshop:

I'll be talking about the 4 types of putty, and showing the use of at least one each from the 3 most useful types:


Traditional Linseed Oil Type, hardening veg oil

Allback Linseed Oil Putty
Sarco MultiGlaze Type M
Crawfords Natural Blend Painters Putty
Perma-Glaze (no longer available)
Old-Time (no longer available)

Modified Oil Type, semi-hardening with petro-oil
Glazol
Perm-E-Lastic
DAP 33

Acrylic Elastomeric, Flexible
Glaze-Ease 601

Acrylic, Hardening
Elmers Glaze-tuff
Aqua-Glaze
****

Most of the training will be with the traditional oil types, using Sarco unless a trainee specifically wants something different. I'll definitely demo Allback, since many are curious about it. I know I'm curious about it and plan to use the workshop to measure people's interest in it.

Glaze-Ease is the only one I have experience with in the Flexible Acrylic Elastomeric category, though there are others. Do either of you have enough experience with Glaze-Ease to demonstrate placing a single line of glazing with it? (corners not necessary) I don't, and if neither of you do, then I might ask John to step in to the workshop for a few minutes to demo it, if he's around that day. It needs a special technique and method that is significantly different than with knife-grade putties. If this stuff is so special and different that it has a "long learning curve" then that is the lesson to teach.

All of the putty talk (as with other topic at this workshop) will first include an objective listing of advantages and disadvantages of each, then "impressionistic" comments can be made by us and to a limited extent the trainees when they have experiences to share. Additional comments can be made during the two question & answer sessions open to the larger group of observers.

Comments?

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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WindowWoman



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
Posts: 49
Location: Topsfield, MA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:45 am    Post subject: Glaze eze Reply with quote

I have done a few windows with Glaze Eze and have the special tool that is suggested. I think I can reasonably demonstrate using it and also the special skill (or patience) required. Definitely not my favorite and I really have a hard time justifying the high cost and skill just to use this product.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alison:

Thanks for the demo offer. I'm beginning to think we'll just talk about this one.

Quote:
I really have a hard time justifying the high cost and skill just to use this product.


That seems to be the consensus of those trying it out a few times. Of course, the only reason to go through the considerable time and effort to learn to use it is that it promises better performance than other glazing compounds.

May I quote you, as above, when I talk about it?

What is your experience on its performance and service life? How long have you had some in place?

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by pen and thought best words are wrought
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WindowWoman



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
Posts: 49
Location: Topsfield, MA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:15 am    Post subject: Glazing in the field Reply with quote

I haven't gone back to check on the windows I did with GlazeEze. This summer I think I'll do a tour. As to demo vs talking about product, I'm assuming Advanced Repair will have a booth at the show, so if people want to see it demonstrated they can go direct to the source.

Sure you can quote me. It's only an opinion.
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johnleeke
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2007 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alison:

Quote:
I'm assuming Advanced Repair will have a booth at the show, so if people want to see it demonstrated they can go direct to the source.


You're right. That's the ideal way to handle it, and I'll be referring workshop participants to other product/service exhibits, and to the Alliance demonstrations on the exhibit floor.

That's the neat thing about conferences, there are so many knowledgeable people there that it is possible find the person who knows the most about a particular topic.

The Sarco people won't be there, so that's the putty we will use for training and demonstration, the other putties they can see in the exhibits.

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John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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