John Leeke's Historic HomeWorks

    207 773-2306      26 Higgins St. Portland, ME  04103

[Home][Library][Restoration Reports][Seminars][Forum][Internships][Office][Workshop][Front Porch][Search] info.© 1994-2015 JohnC.Leeke

Workshops, Training and Seminars

Heart
(why)

 

 

Mind             Hand
(what)            (how)

 

You'll learn to work with all three at Historic HomeWorks training sessions, workshops and seminars.

An important goal of my life’s work is to help as many people as possible by sharing what I have learned working on historic buildings. After forty years of hands-on work and twenty-five years writing and consulting around the country I have found there are many details of restoration work that can only be passed along through live demonstration and personal interaction. I hope to instill participants with my own enthusiasm and channel their new knowledge into a practical approach that will help them achieve their own goals.

-- John

"Hello John,  I'm still working on the windows of my 1776 old house. The class I took from you was remarkable and I've gone places I never thought I would! "

--Jim Lenn,  Class of 2006

"Thanks John.  I really appreciate the personal glazing lesson.  The next day I glazed another window at my house and I must have done it twice as fast as before with the same or better quality work.  I think that reading about something is useful but not nearly as effective as watching a pro's technique." 

–Matt, a DIY homeowner in South Portland, Maine

 

Participant's at Leeke's workshops say:

Once I have arrived and given a workshop folks often want me to come to their home or project for a consultation. My schedule is usually packed and I cannot extend my trip. If you think you will want me to consult while in your area let me know well in advance by email so I can include you in my plans. If you would like me to come to your area to give a workshop show a printout of this webpage to your local, state or regional preservation organization and let me know by email so I can contact them too. Let me know if you need a workshop or seminar in your area. Can't afford to pay the fee for a workshop? Interns and Assistants attend at no cost and I actively seek an assistant for every workshop. Apply by email after you have reviewed Internships and Assistantships.

Email: JohnLeeke@HistoricHomeWorks.com
(For questions or comments on topics other than workshops, visit the Historic HomeWorks Forum)

Current Workshops & Seminars

Current Listing:

 

Save Your Wood Windows Workshop, Portland, Maine

 

Past participants have been contractors, tradespeople and homeowners from Colonial Williamsburg  Virginia, Oregon, Quebec, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, Virginia, Washington DC, North Carolina, New York, California, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Texas and Nebraska. 

Window design has evolved over centuries to enhance the beauty of the building, keep out the storm, let in the breeze, give you a view of the trees, the moon, and the universe beyond. They have held up to decades of use and abuse. With a round of maintenance and a few repairs they will easily last another century. This is why it is worth caring for older and historic windows.

Yet thousands of windows are ripped out of your state's older and historic buildings and hauled to the dump each year. This astonishing loss is due in large part to the fact that few people know how to maintain and repair their existing wood windows. The window replacement industry is figuring they will get their hands on your windows sooner rather than later. In some cases owners succumb to the sales pitch for complete replacement and their entire house-full of windows are lost when all the windows really need is a round of simple maintenance. Learn the most efficient and effective means for saving older and historic windows from the dumpster.

Are you ready to save some windows? This is a hands-on workshop. I’ll guide and train you in the most practical and economic methods of maintenance and repair of older and historic wood windows. Learn how windows were originally constructed, why some last for centuries and others rot and fall apart after just a few years. Learn specific treatments for the ten most common window problems: broken glass and sash cords, rotten sash joints, weathered sills, bowed meeting rails, frame joint decay, and more. Learn traditional woodwork methods and the latest in modern high-tech materials and techniques, including wood-epoxy repairs and steam stripping of sashes.  Lead-safe methods and operations will be demonstrated and used throughout the workshop. The $500 fee includes materials, the latest edition of the Practical Restoration Report titled Save Your Wood Windows, refreshments and light lunch daily.)

Topics covered include: 

  • Conditions: survey, assessment and investigation 
  • Treatments: specific methods, materials and techniques; including wood-epoxy repairs 
  • Planning: project planning, organization and logistics
  • Costing: developing your own standards
  • Maintenance: detailed treatments and schedules for ongoing care
  • Standards:  national Window Preservation Standards

If the topic you need most is not described here write or email Leeke directly and describe what you need to know. Your responses will be tallied and the most popular topics will definitely be covered. (email: JohnLeeke@HistoricHomeWorks.com,  postal: 26 Higgins St., Portland, ME 04103) 

 


Past Workshop Participants:
Ed Sanchez, Window Restoration, CA
Kristin Johnson, homeowner, North Carolina
Stephen Catto, Maine
John Leeke, Instructor
Jade Mortimer, Heartwood Restoration, Mass.
Dean Moye, homeowner, Washington, DC
Richard Libby, Workshop Assistant, Maine

 Participants will received an advance study packet with a list of tools and materials to bring, and your own copy of Save America's Windows, the 177 page book. Each participant will build a "sash easel workbench" which they can keep and use for their own window work. Leeke will reveal inside information such as cost and labor breakdowns as well as the specific materials, methods and techniques used by preservation insiders to save windows all around America.

Eligibility: Open to all handy homeowners, tradespeople, architects and other historic building professionals. All applicants must be in good health, able to do light to moderate physical work, and have health insurance. 

Instructor:  Leeke, a nationally recognized preservation specialist, is well know for his sensitive and practical approach. He has been saving historic buildings for over three decades and has repaired, restored, and preserved hundreds of windows. He has taught window preservation methods for the Preservation Education Institute, Restoration & Renovation Conference, National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference, Windows Conference and Exposition for Historic Buildings, and many state and local historic preservation organizations. Leeke's past window projects include:

Questions from participants:

What are the specific dates?

Usually I finalize the specific dates 3 months ahead based on what will work best for the first 3 or 4 interested people. So, let me know by email (JohnLeeke@HistoricHomeWorks.com) what weeks or dates are your first and second choice. I'll run that into the mix and set the dates 3 months ahead, then let you know. Let me know if you need more advance planning time and I'll set the dates sooner, just for you. Usually the workshops are Fri.Sat.Sun.

Am I correct to assume that the workshop is a one-on-one teaching?

Typically there are 4 to 6 participants, so my time is somewhat divided. Some activities are me presenting topics to the whole group, such as demonstrating the glazing putty method and techniques; or you may work with a participant partner, say, assessing the condition of a window; or working yourself, perhaps repairing a weak sash joint, with my guidance from time to time. Over three days you can count on 2-3 hours of my direct undivided attention with you, one-on-one, and you'll get my close attention another 4-6 hours. I usually have an assistant, which frees up a little more of my time to spend with students individually. 
If you want true one-on-one full-time instruction, I call that "training" and it is available at my standard rate of $700/day. The topics covered are tailored to meet your specific needs and interests.

 

Sign up: Download the application form or copy the form below, print it, fill it in and mail it with your fee. Don't delay, only room for 6 participants.

Application Form for Historic HomeWorks Training and Workshops 

* Location: 26 Higgins St., Portland, Maine, at John Leeke's 1899 barn and workshop 

* Registration deadline: four weeks before the first day of the workshop

Date of workshop:  fill in the dates:  ________________

[ ] Windows Workshop, $500 for three days (Friday, Saturday, Sunday)

[ ] Exterior Woodwork Workshop, $500 for three days (Friday, Saturday, Sunday)

[ ] _____________________________________________________________

[ ] Required:  Basic Fee: $500, for 3 days, includes materials, Save Your Wood Windows publication, refreshments and light lunch daily 

[ ] Required:  I certify that I am in good health, can perform light to moderate physical work and I am covered by a health insurance policy.

Signature: _________________ Date:_____________

Name:

Business or Institution:                                                                    Phone:

Mailing Address:                                                                             Fax:

Town, State, Zip:                                                                             Email:

 

Payment 

Full payment required to reserve your place. If you must cancel after payment, please do it in writing by letter or fax seven days before the first day of the workshop and you will receive 80% of your payment, 20% will be kept as a non-refundable cancellation fee that can be applied to a future workshop. No refunds for cancellations after that date.

[ ]  Check Enclosed, make payable to: John Leeke

[ ]  I would like to be in touch with other participants to explore travel and lodging cooperation.

What I want to learn at this workshop (continue on back):

 

Copy, print, fill in and mail this application to: John Leeke 26 Higgins St. Portland, ME 04103

CALL 207 773-2306 to register by phone. If you get the message machine leave your number and best time to return the call.

 

Travel and Lodging in Portland

Workshop participants are responsible for their own travel and lodging. Interstate I-95 is the main auto route north into Maine, the nearest Portland Exit is #48. Air travelers will use the Portland International Jetport (PWM). The DownEaster passenger rail service to and from Portland connects to Boston's North Station, but it is a bit tricky to make your way to Boston's South Station and Amtrak connections. 

Lodging available at:

Click here for a Google Maps  listing of workshop location, lodgings, including B&Bs.

Fleetwood House, B&B
Linda  Breggia
10 Fleetwood Street
Portland, Maine 04102
(207) 772-9592
www.fleetwoodhousebandb.com
fleetwoodhousebedbreakfast <*at*> hotmail.com
B&B in a fine old home. Pleasant 10 min. walk, 5 min. drive, from workshop location. Includes a big full breakfast. Be sure to mention "John Leeke's Workshop" and get a discount !

Doubletree Hotel 
1230 Congress St
Portland, ME 04102
207-774-5611
Rates: about $159+7%tax per night, single or double occupancy; make your reservation early.
Doubletree Website  Free airport shuttle.
Travel Time to John's place by car: 10 minutes 1.3 miles; or a 40 minute walk through pleasant neighborhoods

 

Exterior Woodwork: Repairs & Painting, Portland Maine, July 18-20, 2014. 

It was an excellent class with a phenomenal instructor. John has a way of finding exactly the right way of helping students whether it is through theory, demonstration or hands-on practice. In the first week since returning from the class, I have been able to put many of the techniques to use with vastly improved results. I can recommend this class and instructor without reservation." 
-- Jan Dekema, California 

Learn how to maintain and repair the exterior woodwork of your fine old place. Decorative features of siding and trim provide much of the architectural character of older and historic homes. This exterior woodwork also provides the practical function of protecting the interior structure of the building from weather and deterioration. Learn how to maintain and repair the exterior woodwork of your fine old place.  Decorative features of siding and trim provide much of the architectural character of older and historic homes. This exterior woodwork also provides the practical function of protecting the interior structure of the building from weather and deterioration. In this workshop you will learn how to maintain and repair the exterior woodwork of your fine old place.

Content Outline 

A. Understanding Exterior Woodwork 
1. Background 
a. History: Development and Types of Woodwork 
b. Construction: Systems and Components 
c. Deterioration: Causes and Prevention 
2. Instruction and Discussion 
a. Structural Support: Within the Walls 
b. Details: Finish Woodwork and Decoration 
c. Types: Weatherboards, Clapboards, Shingles 
d. Repairs: Woodworking Details 
e. Drainage: Keep that Water Moving 
f. Protection: Preservative and Paint 
g. Maintenance: Drainage and Paint 
B. Demonstration & Training (typical topics, may vary depending on students' needs)
1. Traditional Methods: Wood Dutchman, Parts Replacement
2. Wood-Epoxy Repairs
3. Clapboard & Exterior Trim Repairs 
4. Joint Flashing & Caulking 
5. Paint: Removal, Preparation, Application

Register

To sign up please call 207 773-2306 or send Email: JohnLeeke@HistoricHomeWorks.com

Travel and Lodging in Portland

Workshop participants are responsible for their own travel and lodging. Interstate I-95 is the main auto route north into Maine, the nearest Portland Exit is #48. Air travelers will use the Portland International Jetport (PWM). The DownEaster passenger rail service to and from Portland connects to Boston's North Station, but it is a bit tricky to make your way to Boston's South Station and Amtrak connections. 

Lodging available at:

Click here for a Google Maps  listing of workshop location, lodgings, including B&Bs.

Fleetwood House, B&B
Linda  Breggia
10 Fleetwood Street
Portland, Maine 04102
(207) 772-9592
www.fleetwoodhousebandb.com
fleetwoodhousebedbreakfast <*at*> hotmail.com
B&B in a fine old home. Pleasant 10 min. walk, 5 min. drive, from workshop location. Some nice kitties live here too, so if you are allergic call first.

Doubletree Hotel 
1230 Congress St
Portland, ME 04102
207-774-5611
Rates: about $159+7%tax per night, single or double occupancy; make your reservation early.
Doubletree Website  Free airport shuttle.
Travel Time to John's place by car: 10 minutes 1.3 miles; or a 40 minute walk through pleasant neighborhoods

 

Past Workshops & Seminars

For discussions of past workshops, visit the Forum.

 

Traditional Building Conference, Boston, March, 2009.

Managing Maintenance: Planning and Fiscal Responsibility, half-day workshop

Based on thirty-five year's experience working in building preservation, John Leeke, provides a step by step process for assessment, planning, maintaining, and evaluating historic buildings to help professionals, owners, and building managers or stewards. Maintenance is preservation. This session will show you why it is your best economic investment as well.

Comments from Attendees:

" A great too to be used to allow for more efficiency & eliminate mistakes."

"The facilitator really drew out everyone's ideas and projects. It was great!"

"Very Informative. (feel I'm thinking outside the box) Thanks."

Join in the discussion of this session over at the Forum.

 

 

 

Looks Great! (but will it last?), Fri. 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Practical testing of products, materials and methods.

What will work best? You never truly know, but one method or material is bound to work better than another, and that you can know. The process of comparative field testing skirts around all of the commercial product marketing hype and its brand-name belief system. We dare not depend solely on the biased marketing from the building product manufacturers as our only source. We must depend on our own information, experience and knowledge.

John Leeke shows how he adapts the scientific method with his famous farm-yard physics and kitchen chemistry approach. Simple side-by-side tests clearly demonstrate which methods and materials perform best over time. Test are done ‘on the cheap’ with costs and results shared by tradespeople, contractors and building owners. Detailed documentation and publication assure results are available over the long-term to future owners and workers. Immediate benefits include controlling project costs and demonstrating worker capabilities--a good way to overcome many of the unknowns in building preservation. Over the long-term future maintenance costs are reduced--a good way to save more historic fabric. Learn how to set up effective testing and how to use the results.

Participate in the planning for this session at Leeke’s Historic HomeWorks Forum.

 

 

Traditional Building Conference, March 12-15, 2008. Windows, hands-on training.

Get the whole story here.

 

Restore Jacksonville, Florida, Oct. 12th-14th, 2007. Woodwork, Porches, Windows.

Photo Credit

Keynote: John gives his famous Old-House Mechanic's Manifesto talk.

EXTERIOR WOOD RESTORATION: (Saturday, 1 hour) The architectural character of a building is often defined by decorative features such as siding and trim. It also provides the practical function of protecting the interior structure from weather and deterioration. John Leeke will discuss how to to stabilize and save deteriorated exterior woodwork, including porch elements, and will also demonstrate how good design, proper materials selection and effective installation and rehabilitation methods will reduce maintenance, and extend the life of your exterior woodwork.

WOOD WINDOW REPAIR WORKSHOP: (Sunday, 4 hours): Why do so many good old windows end up in the dumpster? Because the building construction industry can make more money selling us cheap plastic imitations. The field of historic preservation provides us with the alternative: knowledgeable tradespeople who know how to maintain and repair windows. Tradespeople and advanced do-it-yourselfers will use and learn the specific methods and procedures that have been proven effective over the past three decades. They will work with traditional materials like linseed oil putty and old-growth pine, as well as the newest methods such as wood-epoxy repairs and portable steam deglazing. Your instructor, John Leeke, has been working on older buildings and their windows for four decades and has been training window workers for more than ten years.

Content: This workshop is not everything about windows. The demonstrations and training will focus specifically on the few most common and needed maintenance methods, repair procedures and treatment strategies. Specific methods are likely to include

A. Paint and putty maintenance;

B. Repair exterior wood sill weather checks;

C. Sash joint repairs;

Actual methods used will be based in part on the needs of the trainees.

Format: This workshop is organized as a “master class” with "hands-on" trainees and observers. 5 trainees will work, hands-on, with the special tools and materials with direct training from the instructor. Another 20 observers will be accepted who can watch the training, take notes and photos, and participate in question & answer sessions.

Trainees: Trainees are pre-selected from those who register as observers. Register and contact John by Sept.1st to assure your consideration as a trainee. 

Plus, there will be many other important presentations at the conference. Learn more and register at www.restorejacksonville.com

 

 

Exterior Woodwork: Repairs & Painting, Portland Maine, Jun.22-24, 2007

It was an excellent class with a phenomenal instructor. John has a way of finding exactly the right way of helping students whether it is through theory, demonstration or hands-on practice. In the first week since returning from the class, I have been able to put many of the techniques to use with vastly improved results. I can recommend this class and instructor without reservation." 
-- Jan Dekema, California

 

 

Learn how to maintain and repair the exterior woodwork of your fine old place. Decorative features of siding and trim provide much of the architectural character of older and historic homes. This exterior woodwork also provides the practical function of protecting the interior structure of the building from weather and deterioration. Learn how to maintain and repair the exterior woodwork of your fine old place.  Decorative features of siding and trim provide much of the architectural character of older and historic homes. This exterior woodwork also provides the practical function of protecting the interior structure of the building from weather and deterioration. In this workshop you will learn how to maintain and repair the exterior woodwork of your fine old place.

Content Outline 

A. Understanding Exterior Woodwork 
1. Background 
a. History: Development and Types of Woodwork 
b. Construction: Systems and Components 
c. Deterioration: Causes and Prevention 
2. Instruction and Discussion 
a. Structural Support: Within the Walls 
b. Details: Finish Woodwork and Decoration 
c. Types: Weatherboards, Clapboards, Shingles 
d. Repairs: Woodworking Details 
e. Drainage: Keep that Water Moving 
f. Protection: Preservative and Paint 
g. Maintenance: Drainage and Paint 
B. Demonstration & Training (typical topics, may vary depending on students' needs)
1. Traditional Methods: Wood Dutchman, Parts Replacement
2. Wood-Epoxy Repairs
3. Clapboard & Exterior Trim Repairs 
4. Joint Flashing & Caulking 
5. Paint: Removal, Preparation, Application

 

Save Your Wood Windows Workshop, Portland, Maine, May.18-20, 2007

John;

Just wanted to let you know how much I appreciated being your assistant
for the window workshop this past weekend. Your knowledge, skill,
experience, and enthusiasm in dealing with all of the complexities of
window restoration, not to mention your excellent communicative teaching
skills made me realize how lucky I was to spend 4 days with the United
States' most accomplished window restoration expert.

Having been involved hands on in my own restoration these past few years
I came away with a much clearer sense of knowing the right way and the
wrong way to conduct repairs on my antique windows. Thank you.

I forgot to thank your awesome wife Phyllis yesterday for all of her
hospitality. Her excellent cooking, deserts, and warm fires were a
real joy on that rainy weekend and definitely brought the entire group
together during our morning and lunchtime breaks. Please let her know
that I really appreciated all of her efforts and her making me feel so
welcome in your home.
I look forward to staying in touch with you and the other members of our
group.
Best regards,  Jack Selvaggio 

John, Thank you again for the knowledge you have passed along to me on saving our windows. Hope to see you again in the future. Sincerely, Josh

I just removed my first two sash and have begun repairs. John's "Save Your Wood Windows" restoration report along with my extensive notes from the seminar back in May are right next to me while I work.

John, thanks again! I cannot wait to glaze my first pane 10 times!

Josh

Saving Heritage Resources with Internet Video, April 2007

for the American Association for History and Computing (AAHC) and Brown University’s Public Humanities Program

Interactive video over the internet is one of the newest forms of collaboration between history professionals and the people they serve. Viewers of the video can connect directly with developers of the video in real time or near-real time. Video viewers can leave text comments and questions in blog format, with the video creators responding with text or video. Even more exciting, video viewers and creators converse with each other in real time via a video conferencing system.  

This workshop illustrates how video and the internet are now used by preservation tradespeople in their work on historic buildings to save our cultural heritage. Specific topics covered include internet video blogging, and live online conferencing. Possibilities are public interpretation of an exhibit by displaying video at a website with the staff responding to questions from the public and research requests; or behind-the-scenes technical training of conservation staff; or to provide live interactive access to difficult locations for disabled persons.

 

 

Porches & Exterior Woodwork, Collingswood, NY, Apr.21 & Apr.28, 2007

Old House Workshops Return: 
March 24 –Wood Window Repair, Instructor Gordon Bock - $20 
April 21 – Porch Restoration & Maintenance, Instructor John Leeke - $20 
April 28 – Exterior Wood Repairs, Instructor John Leeke - $20

Proud Neighbors of Collingswood presents three different full-day Saturday “Old House Workshops” taught by professional preservation instructors. Join us on all three Saturday’s at 8am-5pm for a unique restoration awareness experience. Workshop fees are only $20 each and include lunch. (Similar programs cost over $150.) These workshops have been financed with a contribution from Proud Neighbors of Collingswood and are presented in cooperation with the Borough of Collingswood Historic Preservation Commission. 

March 24 – Wood Window Repair, with Gordon Bock

April 21 – Porch Restoration & Maintenance On Saturday April 21st, John Leeke returns to Collingwood with the Porch Restoration & Maintenance workshop. If you enjoyed his 2004 program, this workshop will have more hands-on demonstrations & audience participation.

Experience this full-day workshop to learn how to repair and save existing porch details; effective maintenance is the key to caring for your fine old porch and Mr. Leeke has many practical economical solutions. Learn how to repair and save original porch details with a wide range of traditional woodworking, modern carpentry practice and high-tech methods such as wood-epoxy repairs. 

April 28 – Exterior Wood Repairs John Leeke hosts a new full-day workshop to learn how to maintain and repair the exterior woodwork of your fine old place. Decorative features such as siding and trim provide much of the architectural character of older and historic homes. This exterior woodwork also provides the practical function of protecting the interior structure of the building from weather and deterioration. (Location: Community Center, 30 W. Collings Avenue and a site visit to a local home .)

Space is limited, so reserve for all three Proud Neighbors’ workshops today! Advance reservations are required. 

Contact: Collingswood Borough Hall, C/O “Old House Workshops”, 678 Haddon Avenue, Collingswood, NJ 08108.  For information call 856-854-0720 (Ext. 125), 609-707-3684 (evenings) or e-mail Info@ProudNeighborsOfCollingswood.org

 

 

 

The Business Side of Preservation, Vermont, Nov. 15-16, 2006

Sponsored by the Preservation Education Institute.

Business practice for the independent preservation tradesperson, professional or smaller contractor. Build a new vision of your own business and how it fits into the fields of preservation and remodeling. Learn how to strengthen what works and how to rebuild the rest. 

As any small business person knows, well planned and implemented management of the business is crucial regardless of the craft and trades knowledge of the owner or crew. In the working world of historic preservation, assessing and planning for the risk of unknown variables inherent in the buildings we save, can make or break a business. The instructor will review assessing unknown variables, assembly of planning teams when confronting conditions that baffle, and proven tests and methods that reduce guesswork in estimating costs and solving problems. When an assessment reveals the worst, knowing how to help your customer cope may make the difference between getting and loosing the job. The instructor will outline suggestions for phasing projects over a period of time. Our field demands certain ethical standards; the instructor will review how to convey the importance of such standards to your customers. 

"I wanted to tell you how valuable I found the course to be. It just seemed to help solidify a lot of what I have experienced over the last ten years, and also curiously enough given me the courage to RAISE my prices. (Amazing, isn't it, that people often do not value bargains, but assume that if it costs more, it must be worth it?) It also gave me the impetus to "sell" the idea of time-and-materials billing to potential customers, which is a far more comfortable way of doing business, less stressful to me and ultimately equally fair to the customer. Lastly, I found the exercise on establishing goals and planning which we undertook on Sunday afternoon to be VERY valuable -- listening as you went through the process with Chris Cole and Sally Fishburn that afternoon was excellent teaching, and I would recommend that in future courses this activity be expanded. Thanks again." --Ed Feiszli, EF&Co., historically respectful remodeling"

"Through attending and assisting at his workshops I have been inspired to finally pursue a solid direction in my woodworking business. Many years ago my stated business goal was to provide preservation and restoration carpentry services to owners of older and historical buildings. However, throughout the years, I have wandered from those goals finding myself deeply frustrated. It wasn't until after attending John Leeke's "Business Side of Preservation Workshop" that a major turning point occurred. His workshop provided the motivation to finally create a mission statement, restate my original goals and then pursue those goals with confidence. John's offering of an assistantship at his workshops added the passion and inspiration needed to ensure obtaining those goals." -- Steven Swiat, Northwood Custom Shop , Cambria, NY

"Thank you for leading a great workshop." -- Judy Hayward, Director, Preservation Education Institute

For four years this workshop has been a hit. Don't sign up for this workshop unless you are ready for major improvements in your business. Past participants say:

Business Side Schedule

First Day

Morning

Business Review 

Preservation Review 

Maintenance Programming 

Afternoon 

Operations 

Marketing 

Management 

Wrap Up 

Second Day 

Morning 

Business Profile of a Preservation Project 

Types of Preservation Projects 

Afternoon 

Marketing in the Preservation Field 

Objectives for Change 

Wrap Up

 

Contact: The Preservation Education Institute, Historic Windsor, PO Box 1777, Windsor, VT, 05089, 802 674-6752, HistWinInc@valley.net  or www.historicwindsor.com for more information on the next Business Side workshop.

 

 

Restore Omaha, Nov. 4-5, 2006.

There are scores of exhibitors and sessions at this two-day event. Here are the sections taught by John Leeke:

Fri, 3rd, 7-10:00pm, Reception, Joslyn Castle, meet up with all of us at this astonishing place.

Sat. 10:30 – 11:30 Ask The Expert with Bob Yapp & John Leeke 

Exterior Woodwork, Sat, 1:30-2:30

The architectural character of a building is often defined by decorative features such as siding and trim. It also provide the practical function of protecting the interior structure from weather and deterioration. Learn how to stabilize, repair and maintain exterior woodwork. Slide show talk.

Window Repair Workshop, Sun. 9:00-1:00

Maintaining and repairing your existing wooden windows is an effective alternative to plastic replacement windows. Learn low-cost stabilization, paint and putty maintenance, traditional repairs and high-tech wood-epoxy repairs. Weatherization:  keep the wind out, keep the dollars in. See the amazing Steam Paint Removal method—it works on rock-hard putty too! Hands-on workshop demonstration.

 

Learn more and register at http://www.restoreomaha.com

 

Window Workshop, Portland, May 2006

Three days of training at my shop in the barn out back.


Here we all are. I'd say this crew is qualified to save some windows.
Janet was taking the photo, so she's not shown.

 

TPI WOODEN WINDOW REPAIR, May 18 – 20, 2006

Thousands of wood windows are ripped out of this country’s older and historic buildings each year. This astonishing loss is due in part to the fact that few people remain skilled in the repair and maintenance of wooden windows. In the three-day workshop, Instructor John Leeke will guide participants through practical and economic methods to deal with broken glass, rotten sash joints, weathered sills, bowed meeting rails, frame joint decay, and more. Learn how windows were originally constructed, why some last for centuries and others rot and fall apart after just a few years. Using windows from the American  Precision Museum of Windsor, Vermont, participants will learn to conduct assessment surveys, evaluate window treatment options, plan and cost window repair projects and how to plan for scheduled window maintenance. 

Instructor:  John Leeke is a preservation consultant from Portland, Maine.  John helps owners, tradespeople, architects, and contractors understand and maintain historic buildings. He has been and still spends a good part of his time “with hammer in hand”.  He is a frequent lecturer for APT International, The National Trust for Historic Preservation, and nonprofits throughout the U.S.

Date:               Thursday –  Saturday, May 18 – 20, 2006

Time:               8:30 AM – 4:30 PM daily 

Location:           American Precision Museum, Main St, Windsor, Vermont           

Cost:               APM/HWI member/government staff: $330

                        Others: $350

(includes materials, John Leeke’s Wooden Window Practical Restoration Report, and lunch daily)

For more information go to the Preservation Education Institute's website: Wooden Window

 

 

Old-House Fair, Manchester, CT, April 22nd, 2006

Window Work & Porch Preservation, John gives a one-hour show & tell with plenty of time for questions & answers on each topic
10:50am-12:20—Windows. 
2:10am-3:10—Porches

Location: Manchester, CT, Manchester Community College

"Thanks again for being our featured presenter this weekend. I hear nothing but great things from our participants." -- Mary Dunne, Executive Director

More Info: Manchester Historical Society, 860 647-9983

 

Landmarks Old-House Trade Show, Portland, Maine, March 18-19, 2006

(not really a workshop, just helping a couple of the exhibitors sell their goods)

March 18: John will be signing his newly released book, The Practical Restoration Report Compendium, at the Schuyler Rare Books exhibit.

March 19: John will be demonstrating wood clapboard installation (butt joints & scarf joints) at the Ward Clapboard Mill exhibit.

Location: Westbrook College Campus Gymnasium, 716 Stevens Ave., Portland, Maine, $10 admission for the whole show. Contact Greater Portland Landmarks for more info,  207-774-5561 info@portlandlandmarks.org

 

Restore Omaha, November 5 & 6, 2005

A two- day conference with many sessions on a wide range of preservation topics, including the noted Bob Yapp and several other speakers.

A frequent contributor to Old House Journal John Leeke grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska and watched his father learn the woodworking trade from Keats Lorenz, an early 20th Century woodcarver and architectural stylist who worked on Nebraska’s State Capitol. Leeke now lives in Portland, Maine and gives preservation workshops through his company Historic Home Works. John Leeke is a mechanic in the old sense of the word: “A skilled craftsman who fixes what breaks and works to keep the house operating properly.” He has distilled four decades of working on old houses to give you the low down on what works and what doesn’t; when to do it and when to let it go; and who to listen to and who to ignore. Leeke’s presentation is sponsored by Midtown Neighborhood Alliance through grants from Mutual of Omaha and the Omaha Community Foundation’s Neighborhood Grant Program provided by the William and Ruth Scott Family Foundation. 

Every year thousands of good wood windows are ripped out of older homes and tossed in the dumpster. Listen to John Leeke to learn how to save yours from this tragic fate.

John Leeke, author of the soon-to-be-released National Park Service Preservation Brief Porch Preservation, will teach attendees how to repair and save existing porch details.

 Learn more about the Restore Omaha conference at:  http://www.destinationmidtown.org/event-detail.asp?eventID=16, or ontact: Restore Omaha; c/o Neighborhood Center for Greater Omaha; 115 S. 49th Ave. UNO, Annex 11; Omaha, NE 68132

 

 

Save Your Wood Windows Workshops, South Dakota, September 2006

The workshops are free to the public and will be held:

Thousands of wood windows are ripped out of South Dakota's older and historic buildings each year and hauled to the dump. Usually the windows contribute to the character and good looks of a building, which is lost as well-just like throwing the baby out with the wash water. This astonishing loss is due in large part to the fact that few people know how to care for existing wood windows.

The South Dakota State Historical Society will host a series of window maintenance and repair workshops in September. The workshops provide an economical and practical alternative to trashing your fine old windows and buying replacements made of plastic. You will see how others have saved their windows and learn how you can use the most practical and economic methods of window maintenance and repair to save your own windows. Homeowners will learn how to avoid falling under the spell of the window replacement salesman. Do-it-yourselfers and tradespeople will learn traditional methods and the latest in contemporary high-tech materials and techniques.

An import purpose of the workshops is to bring building owners and contractors together. It is expected that home and building owners who attend will meet the tradespeople who do this work and the tradespeople and contractors who attend will pick up leads for future work.

All three workshops will include detailed maintenance and repair methods for people of all skill levels, from do-it-yourself homeowners to tradespeople and contractors:

The workshops at Frederick and Yankton will be three days and include detailed hands-on training: 

At the beginning of each workshop (Friday, September 16th; Tuesday, September 20th; and Friday, September 23rd), Leeke will provide a basic introduction and demonstration of window repair and maintenance. Those who wish to attend only one day must attend on the first day of the workshop. Those who want more detailed hands-on training should plan on attending all three days of the workshop.

John Leeke of Portland, Maine, a nationally known preservation consultant and author of Save Your Wood Windows, will present the workshops. 

Get a head start on your window training by checking the Workshop Preparation page:

Each class size will be limited to eight people so please RSVP by September 2nd to reserve your spot. To RSVP or for more information, please contact Jason Haug with the State Historic Preservation Office of the State Historical Society at (605) 773-6296 or jason.haug@state.sd.us .

 

 

 

Save Your Wood Windows, Portland, Maine, June 6-8, 2005. 

This group of dedicated tradespeople and homeowners met at John's shop in Portland to learn window maintenance and repair methods.

Although I have been in the business a few years, I learned some valuable tips of the trade at the Window Workshop. --Jade Mortimer

"When I got back from the workshop I was thrust into a messy window repair job that included a lot of termite damage and wood rot. We spent a whole week on this job and I must say I never felt more sure of myself deciding whether to replace the wood or use epoxy techniques. I was a lot less stressed. I also realized that half of the sashes I replaced could have had part replacements in a reasonable amount of time. The epoxy methods we learned have made me more effective. The  [lead-safe work practices] info shook my partner and I up enough to start to make changes."  --Ed Sanchez

Ed Sanchez came to learn about historic windows, then returned home to firmly re-establish his window business in that market. View this video from the Press Telegram in Long Beach, California:

Read the whole article about Ed's business.

Workshop Participants:
Ed Sanchez, Window Restoration & Repair, California
Kristin Johnson, homeowner, North Carolina
Stephen Catto, Maine
John Leeke, Instructor
Jade Mortimer, Heartwood Restoration, Massachusetts
Dean Moye, homeowner, Washington, DC
Richard Libby, Workshop Assistant, Maine

 

 

 

Save Your Wood Windows Demonstration, Manchester, New Hampshire, April 2-3, 2005.

2005 New Hampshire Old House & Barn Expo

Saturday, April 2nd, 3 pm. Slide Show, Question & Answer Session 

Sunday, April 3rd, 10 am -1 pm Work Demonstrations: 
Are you ready to save some windows? John Leeke will share practical and economical methods of maintenance and repair of older and historic wood windows in this session filled with work demonstrations. Learn about window construction and common problems as well as traditional woodwork methods and the latest in modern high-tech materials and techniques for repairs. A package of take-home hand-outs is included in registration fee. 

($8 Expo admission, $25 PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED) For more information:  NH Preservation Alliance, 603 224-2281 

"High marks for your lecture and workshop. We will be in touch about future programming." -- Jennifer Goodman, Exec. Dir., New Hampshire Preservation Alliance

 

 

Save Your Wood Windows, Portland, Maine September, 2004

Three professional tradespeople, three dedicated homeowners and one preservation student attended the three-day workshop. Ginger, the preservation student, stayed for two additional days of one-on-one training. All went back home to use what they learned on their own homes and projects. Read about their results in Post-workshop Discussions where you will find more photos. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Save Your Wood Windows, South Dakota (Sioux Falls, Watertown, Pierre, Rapid City, Deadwood). September 1-12, 2004. 

Leeke demonstrates sash removal methods at the Deadwood workshop. Susan Hoffmann, Workshop Assistant from Armour, rescued the sample window from a "rip and replace" remodeling project just a day before the first workshop. The window now has a second life educating South Dakotans on how to save older and historic windows.

Heather McCauley, preservation carpenter from Rapid City, guides a workshop participant in the finer points of window glazing. Heather is a recent graduate of the Belmont Technical College preservation trades training program.

"Thanks for putting on an excellent workshop. I enjoyed meeting you and hope that you can return when you have more time to explore deadwood and the black hills. Good workshop, informative, entertaining." -- Jim Wilson, Deadwood’s Historic Preservation Officer

"On September 11, 2004, the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission hosted a window restoration workshop for individuals with historic homes or businesses interested in using the repair techniques in the restoration of their property. The workshop was given by noted window expert John Leeke and sponsored by the South Dakota State Historic Preservation Office. The event lasted five hours and attracted an audience of 15 participants from throughout the area. Each of them gained hands-on experience in the repair and restoration of wood windows. "People used to perform simple repairs themselves, but in contemporary society it's become much more common to simply call a repairman," said Jim Wilson, the Historic Preservation Officer for the City of Deadwood. "People often think that they're too busy, or that they don't know enough about it. This workshop enabled people to see just how easy it is to restore their home." Leeke guided participants in the disassembly and repair of historic windows so that they could use the same technique on their property. "Most of the audience there were thrilled," Wilson said. "It was a lot simpler than many of them thought." -- History Link, Nov. 2004, newsletter of the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission

 

 

 

Historic Home Repairs: Windows & Siding 
Williston, Vermont, May 1 and 8, 2004

"Your Williston workshkop last Saturday was very informative & helpful--as is your Save Your Wood Windows book." -- N.C., Williston

The Town of Williston's Historic Preservation Committee hosts two Saturday workshops.

May 1, 2004, 8:45am to 4:00pm, Save Your Wood Windows 
May 8, 2004: 8:45am to 4:00pm, Care for Your Wood Siding 

Location: Williston Town Hall, 7900 Williston Road 

 

Morning Slideshow: 

Morning Demonstration: 

Afternoon Demonstrations:

Instructor: John Leeke, Preservation Consultant, helps owners, planners, tradespeople, contractors and architects understand and maintain their older and historic buildings. He is well known for his sensitive and practical approach. He has been saving historic buildings for 30 years and has personally repaired, restored, and preserved hundreds of windows and helped others save thousands more. To get a head start on the workshop you can do a little homework on windows and siding at:

www.HistoricHomeWorks.com

Morning beverages and baked goods will be provided. Bring your own lunch. For more information contact: Lara DuMond, Planning Assistant, 802 878-6704, ext. 130. Workshops are FREE and open to ALL interested participants. These workshops have been made possible with the assistance of a matching grant from the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation through the U.S. Department if the Interior under provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Porch Preservation
Collingswood, New Jersey, April 24, 2004

Sponsored by Proud Neighbors of Collingswood.

  Learn how to repair and save existing porch details with a wide range of traditional woodworking, modern carpentry practice and high-tech methods. This approach depends on craft knowledge and skill rather than the purchase and installation of standard products. Although it is labor intensive the bottom line can be much less costly than major porch rebuilding with all new materials. A fundamental understanding of wood characteristics and deterioration results in long-term low-maintenance performance. Effective maintenance is the key to preserving your fine old porch.

Porch Restoration & Maintenance- New for 2004 ! Learn how repair and save existing porch details. Effective maintenance is the key to caring for your fine old porch. John Leeke, Preservation Consultant, has practical economical solutions. Leeke is author of the new U.S. Dept. of Interior, Preservation Brief, titled Porch Preservation. Do-it-yourself homeowners will learn specific maintenance methods, how to determine when you can't do it yourself and when to bring in the professionals. Tradespeople and contractors will consider this an introduction to the preservation of historic porches and an opportunity to contact interested homeowners. The morning's slide shows include the history and development of porch styles, their construction, deterioration and how to prevent it. Effective methods of column base repair, woodwork repair, painting and maintenance are covered. Afternoon demonstrations include making new wooden parts, sealing open joints and wood-epoxy repairs. 

Free Advice for Your Porch! Proud Neighbors Of Collingswood will sponsor a consult from John Leeke, the nationally recognized preservation consultant, for a lucky Collingswood homeowner. To be considered for this valuable opportunity, homeowners must be willing to have workshop participants visit their porch and yard for workshop demonstrations by Leeke. To qualify for consideration you must submit the following by March 15th: 1. A photo of your porch, your name, address, phone, and brief written description of your porch and why you think it needs help. 2. Be willing to have 20 to 30 workshop participants visit your porch and yard during the afternoon of the workshop. 3. Sign a no-cost-to-you contract with John Leeke, who carries standard liability insurance, and 4., Sign a release agreement with Proud Neighbors Of Collingswood. If you and your porch are selected, John Leeke will give your porch a one-hour conditions survey with verbal recommendations for its preservation. To submit your application contact: csickler@collingswood.com

Workshop Outline
     Registration 9 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
     Introduction 9:15 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
     Course 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

A. Understanding Wooden Porches
     1. Background
          a. History: Development and Porch Styles
          b. Construction: Systems and Components
          c. Deterioration: Causes and Prevention
     2. Instruction and Discussion
          a. Structural: Deck and Roof
          b. Support: Columns and Posts
          c. Details: Finish Woodwork
          d. Drainage: Keep that Water Moving
          e. Repairs: Woodworking Details
          f. Protection: Preservative and Paint
          g. Maintenance: Drainage and Paint

     Lunch 12: 30 - 1:30 p.m.
     Course 1:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

B. Demonstrations
     1. Make a baluster replacement of new wood
     2. Wood-Epoxy repair of decayed wood
     3. Seal up an open joint

Workshop Instructor’ s Qualifications

John Leeke is a preservation consultant who helps owners, tradespeople, contractors and architects understand and maintain their historic buildings. He frequently consults with homeowners helping them solve their porch problems and plan projects. He has been preserving historic buildings for over 30 years and still spends a good part of his time "with hammer in hand." Leeke has a national reputation as a consultant and writer on restoration and preservation topics. His maintenance procedures have been adopted as standard treatments by the General Services Administration and the Dept. of the Army as they care for their historic buildings. Over one-hundred of his articles have appeared in national publications. He has lectured and presented workshops for local, state and national organizations including the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Association for Preservation Technology International, and Restoration/Renovation International Conferences. Current projects include writing a new Preservation Brief on Porch Preservation for the National Park Service, and restoring the porch on his own 1899 Victorian in Portland, Maine.

Wood Window Preservation, Poland Springs, Maine, March, 2004

"62 students attended this year’s My Old House workshops, which were sponsored by Norway Savings Bank and the Kennebec Company. In kind support was also provided by Poland Spring Bottling Company and Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village. Faculty members Peter Lord, Richard Irons, John Leeke, Bob Dunning, Les Fossel, Martha Frost and Andrea Strassner joined forces to provide 20 hours of instruction, demonstration and hands on guidance." -- Maine Preservation News. Spring 2004

(photo courtesy Maine Preservation)

“The hands on sessions were great!” John Leeke demonstrates window restoration techniques.

The Business Side of Preservation
Vermont, Feb. 28-29, 2004

Business practice for the independent preservation tradesperson, professional or smaller contractor. Build a new vision of your own business and how it fits into the fields of preservation and remodeling. Learn how to strengthen what works and how to rebuild the rest. 

"I wanted to tell you how valuable I found the course to be. It just seemed to help solidify a lot of what I have experienced over the last ten years, and also curiously enough given me the courage to RAISE my prices. (Amazing, isn't it, that people often do not value bargains, but assume that if it costs more, it must be worth it?) It also gave me the impetus to "sell" the idea of time-and-materials billing to potential customers, which is a far more comfortable way of doing business, less stressful to me and ultimately equally fair to the customer. Lastly, I found the exercise on establishing goals and planning which we undertook on Sunday afternoon to be VERY valuable -- listening as you went through the process with Chris Cole and Sally Fishburn that afternoon was excellent teaching, and I would recommend that in future courses this activity be expanded. Thanks again." --Ed Feiszli, EF&Co., historically respectful remodeling"

"Through attending and assisting at his workshops I have been inspired to finally pursue a solid direction in my woodworking business. Many years ago my stated business goal was to provide preservation and restoration carpentry services to owners of older and historical buildings. However, throughout the years, I have wandered from those goals finding myself deeply frustrated. It wasn't until after attending John Leeke's "Business Side of Preservation Workshop" that a major turning point occurred. His workshop provided the motivation to finally create a mission statement, restate my original goals and then pursue those goals with confidence. John's offering of an assistantship at his workshops added the passion and inspiration needed to ensure obtaining those goals." -- Steven Swiat, Northwood Custom Shop , Cambria, NY

"Thank you for leading a great workshop." -- Judy Hayward, Director, Preservation Education Institute

For three years this workshop has been a hit. Don't sign up for this workshop unless you are ready for major improvements in your business. Past participants say:

As any small business person knows, well planned and implemented management of the business is crucial regardless of the craft and trades knowledge of the owner or crew. In the working world of historic preservation, assessing and planning for the risk of unknown variables inherent in the buildings we save, can make or break a business. The instructor will review assessing unknown variables, assembly of planning teams when confronting conditions that baffle, and proven tests and methods that reduce guesswork in estimating costs and solving problems. When an assessment reveals the worst, knowing how to help your customer cope may make the difference between getting and loosing the job. The instructor will outline suggestions for phasing projects over a period of time. Our field demands certain ethical standards; the instructor will review how to convey the importance of such standards to your customers. 

Contact: The Preservation Education Institute, Historic Windsor, PO Box 1777, Windsor, VT, 05089, 802 674-6752, HistWinInc@valley.net  or www.historicwindsor.com for more information on the next Business Side workshop.

 

 

Best Practices for
Condition Assessments of Historic Structures, Sept. 21-22, 2003

Tentative Program

Welcome and Introductions
Tom McGrath, Superintendent, National Park Service Historic Preservation Training Center, Frederick, MD
IMLS and Heritage Preservation representatives

Pejepscot Historical Society Case Study: An in-depth look at this museum's 1999 CAP experience and what elements spurred it on to seek additional funding and systematically implement recommendations from their reports. 

Maximizing the Site-Visit: An examination of what factors make site-visitsgo particularly well and what the museum and the assessor can each do to make the two days on-site more efficient and productive. 

Working with Collection Assessors: How architectural and collections assessors can collaborate on-site and in report writing to insure that the museum gets appropriate conservation and preservation advice in which the care of collections does not compromise the historic integrity of the building(s) and, conversely, building conditions do not adversely affect collections within. 

Writing Effective Reports: How to write reports with each institution's
governance and resources in mind in order to increase the probability that
the report recommendations will be addressed.

Incorporating Technology: Since CAP began there have been numerous
technological innovations that can streamline gathering information on-site,
producing reports and communicating with museums. There is also facilities
management software available that can help CAP architectural assessors.

Conclusion

To build upon the program with hands-on sessions, the APT board is coordinating an optional second day program to be held on-site at the Victoria Mansion. It will have a separate registration fee, yet to be determined. Contact Rory House to keep you informed of this program as it develops.

For more information call Rory House at 202 634-0031 or e-mail rhouse@heritagepreservation.org

 

 

Save Your Wood Windows, Salem, New Jersey, May 19, 2001

Part I:   How to avoid falling under  the spell of the window replacement salesman. Slide show and lecture.

Part 2:  Demonstration of tools, methods and materials for repair of weathered sills and deteriorating sash.

"Thank you so much for taking the time to come all the way to Salem, NJ, to speak on Windows. Your talk was a real hit." --Steven Smith, President, Preservation Salem, Inc.

 

A Day of Restoration: The Care and Feeding of Your Old House, Norwich CT, October 30, 1999

A full day program sponsored by the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation in cooperation with the Norwich Heritage Trust, drew 50 people to the Park Congregational Church. The program, which cost $60 for CTHP members and $65 for non-members, featured John Leeke, nationally recognized preservation consultant and contributing editor of the Old House Journal. He used the morning session to explain how to conduct a survey of an old house to determine what problems exist and what the causes could be. Then he told how to formulate a plan for the restoration and maintenance of the house. A tour of the Dr. Patrick Cassidy House at 98 Washington St. was the highlight of the afternoon session. A lavish example of Stick Style Architecture, the house was recently purchased by a private individual who has started the restoration process. Conference participants toured the first floor. The program was financially supported by The Old House Journal, Middlesex Mutual Insurance Company, and The Anderson-Paffard Foundation and Norwich Heritage Trust.

 

 

Exterior Woodwork Details, Banff, Alberta, Canada, Association for Preservation Technology, Post-conference workshop, 3 days. October 24-26, 1999

Presentation Team

The following professionals provided their knowledge and expertise to this wide and varied field of exterior wood conservation and protection.

Project Profiles:

As organizers of APT's 1999 Exterior Wood Course we recognize much of our real learning takes place on the job site and therefore would like to offer a segment of the course entitled, Project Profiles. This would be an opportunity for you roll up your sleeves, dig down and present your most vexing exterior wood problems and come back up with effective solutions. Share your best and most successful methods, or present your worst nightmare and return home with practical solutions. We encourage you to share your practical learning with others and enable this forum to be a true networking of preservation knowledge and experience.

Wooden Window Repair
New Hampshire
, Enfield Shaker Museum, June 25-27, 1999

Thanks again for a great class. One of the best points for me was when you explained how to break projects down into steps for people who would otherwise say a repair was beyond them. That idea will be just as useful for me in trying to hire help on a budget as would be for a contractor/craftsperson delegating work to lower-skilled workers. -- Sue Cummings, workshop student

Thousands of wood windows are ripped out of this country’s older and historic buildings and hauled to the dump each year. This astonishing loss is due in large part to the fact that few people know how to maintain and repair their existing wood windows. In this three day workshop John Leeke guides and trains you in the most practical and economic methods of maintenance and repair of older and historic wood windows. Learn specific treatments for the ten most common wood window problems: broken glass, rotten sash joints, weathered sills, bowed meeting rails, frame joint decay, and more. Learn how windows were originally constructed, why some last for centuries and others rot and fall apart after just a few years. Learn traditional methods and the latest in modern high-tech materials and techniques:

If the topic you need most is not listed here email me directly and describe what you need to know. Your responses will be tallied and the most popular topics will definitely be covered. Do not expect individual replies, I'm busy fixing up the windows in my own house this spring.

Windows of the Soul

Like the eyes of your best friend, windows give you a view into the soul of a building. The Shakers knew this as well as how to make windows that last. This workshop will take place at the Enfield Shaker Museum at Enfield, New Hampshire with the opportunity to study Shaker windows in detail. Leeke will reveal inside information such as cost and labor breakdowns as well as the specific materials, methods and techniques he used to preserved fourteen double-hung wood windows at the Sabbathday Lake Shaker village in Maine.

This is a hands-on workshop. Participants will received an advance list of tools and materials to bring including an old sash to work on. Each participant will build a "sash easel workbench" which they can keep and use for their own window work.

Protecting Historic and Antique Homes
Fairfield, CT, May 7, 1999

Middlesex Mutual Insurance Sponsors Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation Conference

John Leeke, nationally renowned preservation consultant, will present a workshop on historic home preservation

WHO: Middletown, Conn. ­ based Middlesex Mutual Assurance Company, one the largest home insurers in Connecticut.

WHEN: Friday, May 7, 1999. The conference runs from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

WHERE: Fairfield, CT, Historic District, Historical Society building.

WHAT: Annual Statewide Preservation Conference ­ sponsored by Middlesex Mutual Assurance Company. The conference consists of a day of educational workshops and informative speakers on historic preservation topics, including urban sprawl, protection for the historic home, and legislative planning for preservation.

Speakers will include Richard Moe, president National Trust for Historic Preservation and nationally renowned Preservation Consultant, John Leeke.

Middlesex will host a workshop at 2:00 p.m. on strategies for protecting historic properties and antique homes. John Leeke and Ellen Brown, Middlesex Mutual's Historic Home Division, will provide insights and advice on maintaining and protecting historic homes.

Wood Windows and Conditions Survey & Investigation
Rockland, Maine, May, 1999

The Maine Preservation Annual Conference featured a full day of "Old House School" lectures and workshops. Leeke presented two side show talks: Wood Windows and Conditions Survey & Investigations.

"Your expertise is so highly regarded, and our attendees were thrilled for the one-on-one time they were able to spend with you ...from the positive response we received from those who took part we may organize a repeat performance next year ... Thanks for making this conference a success, and for your personal dedication to your craft and preserving Maine's irreplaceable historic resources." -- Roxanne Eflin, Executive Dir., Maine Preservation

For information on next year's conference in Maine, contact Roxanne Eflin.

Wood Windows
Maine
, April 16, 1999

Attendees at the annual workshop of the Certified Local Governments and Historic Preservation Commissions of Maine learned to recognize degrees of window deterioration and understand the pros and cons of restoration vs. Replacement at this two-hour slide show and talk. The organizer, Roxanne Eflin, Executive Director of Maine Preservation writes:

"Thank you for your excellent presentation on historic windows...You provided both Commissioners and historic building owners with the facts and figures to support the restoration of historic wood windows, rather than replacement. your advice of using either traditional and/or high tech solutions to repair deteriorated windows was invaluable to attendees. The 1999 Workshop was the most successful CLG workshop in recent years. The variety of topics and the quality of the presentations this year far exceeded that of previous years, and the feedback has been very positive from the attendees. Your help in making this workshop a success has added to the momentum..."

For information on next year's workshop at Lewiston, Maine, contact Roxanne Eflin.

What To Do
(when you don't know what to do)
With Your
(historic or just plain)
Old House

Leeke demonstrates porch condition investigation techniques for the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation workshop series,
April, 1998, in West Haven, Connecticut.

Connecticut, Spring 1998

Facing unusual problems in historic building preservation is an every day occurrence. This series of four Saturday workshops covered practical methods for old-house problem solving with an emphasis on what you can do yourself and how to find the tradespeople and contractors who can do the rest. While it is important not to begin work before you know what to do, hopeful neglect is no substitute for action. Participants learned how to:

Each day included a morning forum of slides shows, talks, and question & answer sessions with a panel of experts.

Afternoon site visits to local restoration projects included chimney investigation, research at the local records office, exterior woodwork and ironwork repair methods and hand plastering demonstrations. Here John shows Dan how to assess the condition of his porch railing and posts at an afternoon site visit.

The series was organized by the Connecticut Trust of Historic Preservation. For information on Leeke's next workshop in Connecticut call the Trust at 203 562-6312.

The workshop series was reviewed for the AIA Connecticut News by Jay Bright, AIA

"The series provided an excellent overview of the issues confronting restorers of older or historic homes. The content was comprehensive and was a good mix of presentations, interaction with experts and on-site visits." -- participant evaluation

 

Caring for Your Historic Home
South Dakota
, Brookings, Sioux Falls, Aberdeen & Deadwood, May 1998

Morning Slide Shows and Lectures:

Maintenance Planning for Older and Historic Buildings
Do you think you will catch up with everything that needs to be done? Step back, take a deep breath and get ready for a new way to look at your building. Learn the for steps of maintenance planning: assess, plan, maintain, evaluate. Save time and money caring for your historic building.

Wood Windows
Preserving and repairing wood windows can be more economical than complete replacement. This especially true when the historic character and value of original windows is considered. The decision is often made to replace the entire window (frame, sash and all) when only minor repairs and routine maintenance are needed. Learn several effective repair and maintenance methods for sash, sills and frames including specific procedures, materials and techniques.

Afternoon Demonstrations:

Wood Windows

Assessing Conditions
Specific Repair Methods and Materials

Exterior Paint

Tracking Down Causes of Paint Failure
Surface Preparation
Products and Application

If you would like to have more workshops in South Dakota contact Mary Troutman-Gates at the South Dakota State Historical Society (605 773-6005, maryt@chc.state.sd.us) for more information or, Christopher Hetzel, Office of Historic Preservation, City of Deadwood (hpc@deadwood.net)

Just a brief note of thanks for the Restoration Workshop which you presented
and I attended last Friday in Sioux Falls.  Lots of good and useful
information to use on our 1989 home.  Best wishes to you and yours!

Have a great day and life,

        Henry J. Knapp

Restoration '98 Conference
Boston, May 12-14, 1998

This four day event included technical training, commercial exhibits and a conference of over forty technical sessions. Two of these sessions were presented by John Leeke, Preservation Consultant:

Windows of the Soul

The Shakers at Sabbathday Lake, Maine, saved their old horse stable windows rather than replacing them. Learn why and how with John Leeke, Preservation Consultant as he reveals inside information such as cost and labor breakdowns as well as the specific materials, methods and techniques he used to preserved fourteen double-hung wood windows. This talk and slide show also serves as an introduction to Leeke's Wood Window Workshop.

Wood Window Workshop

In this three hour workshop John Leeke demonstrates repairs and treatments for the ten most common wood window problems: broken glass, rotten sash joints, weathered sills, bowed meeting rails, frame joint decay, and more. See traditional and high-tech materials, methods and techniques used on authentic Shaker windows. Leeke has been saving historic buildings for 27 years and has repaired, restored, and conserved hundreds of windows. Learn the most efficient and effective means for saving older and historic windows from the dumpster.

 

Careers in Preservation, Panel Discussion

John Leeke and a panel of three other preservation professionals describe how their careers developed and respond to questions and comments from the audience.

Admission to the conference ranges from $100. to $200. For more information call 508 664-8066 or fax 508 664-5822 or email: show@egiexhib.com.

First Online Live Conference in the Field of Preservation held at the International Preservation Trades Workshop

International Preservation Trades Workshop, Frederick, Maryland, Nov. 5-7, 1997 Tom McGrath, Superintendent NPS Historic Preservation Training Center, 301 663-8206.

This four day assembly of tradespeople took place Nov. 5-8, 1997 in Frederick, Maryland. Participants had access to personal computers for their exploration of the internet and other electronic resources. John Leeke hosted a live online conference through his Historic HomeWorks web site. For an hour and a half, 15 workshop attendees conferred with Leeke on the use of computers in preservation with live text and real-time video.

"My personal computer and the internet are like my bench saw: another tool that can help me do my best work. I might use my bench saw to rip a board to width efficiently, and then use a wooden hand plane to refine the surface. Typically I use the internet to find the people who know what I need to know, then I use my skills in dealing with people to learn from them. The internet is a two-way road. Through it I can also help others very efficiently. For example, my website has over half a million words of practical preservation information available for your reference and use. Nearly a thousand people a week log onto my web site. Join me Thursday afternoon for an online conference at my web site to learn more." -- John Leeke

"The computer session was great. Many folks benefited from your contribution. Thanks for sharing your passion for the preservation trades!" -- Laurie Hempton, Event Coordinator, International Preservation Trades Workshop

 

The Business Side of Preservation
Vermont, July 19-20, 1997, and again in 1999

Two years running this workshop was a hit. Don't sign up for this workshop unless you are ready for major improvements in your business. Learn how to strengthen what works and how to rebuild the rest. Past participants say:

As any small business person knows, well planned and implemented management of the business is crucial regardless of the craft and trades knowledge of the owner or crew. In the working world of historic preservation, assessing and planning for the risk of unknown variables inherent in the buildings we save, can make or break a business. The instructor will review assessing unknown variables, assembly of planning teams when confronting conditions that baffle, and proven tests and methods that reduce guesswork in estimating costs and solving problems. When an assessment reveals the worst, knowing how to help your customer cope may make the difference between getting and loosing the job. The instructor will outline suggestions for phasing projects over a period of time. Our field demands certain ethical standards; the instructor will review how to convey the importance of such standards to your customers. Build a new vision of your own business and how it fits into the fields of preservation and remodeling.

Contact: The Preservation Institute, Historic Windsor, PO Box 1777, Windsor, VT, 05089, 802 674-6752, HistWinInc@valley.net www.historicwindsor.com for more information on accomodations, travel, etc.

Approximate Cost: $165. For information on current workshops at The Preservation Institute call 802 674-6752 or fax 802 674-6179.

Your Neighborhood, Your Home
Terre Haute, Indiana, June 20-21, 1997

The Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana holds its annual meeting on Friday, June 20, with Preservation Demonstrations the following day at the 1892 Romanesque Revival Presbyterian Church on Washington Avenue.

John Leeke, heads up the morning forum with presentations on Planning a Rehab: Survey, Assessment & Treatments. Comprehensive surveys and detailed assessments help you set goals and provide a focus for planning effective treatments. He will also cover Organizing and Phasing a Restoration Project. Spreading work out over a few or several years can ease budget constraints and give you a chance to learn as you go. A strong maintenance program can substitute for a costly major project.

John is a nationally recognized preservation consultant from Portland, Maine, who helps owners, contractors and architects understand and maintain their older and historic buildings. He is a Contributing Editor for Old-House Journal and publisher of the Practical Restoration Reports. The day's program also includes planning historic landscapes and craft demonstrations on plaster repair, wood windows, floor refinishing, exterior color analysis, and energy efficiency.

For more information call the Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, 812 232-4534

Caring for Your Historic Home
Central City, Colorado, May 16-17

Central City will be celebrating National Preservation Week in style this May. The city's Historic Preservation Commission will host the first Preservation Honor Awards on Friday evening, May 16th at 6:00 p.m. The event will be held in the landmark Central City Opera House, which is currently undergoing a significant interior renovation. The evening's special guest speaker will be John Leeke, contributing editor of Old-House Journal and a nationally renown preservation specialist based in Portland, Maine.

Mr. Leeke will also conduct a timely and invaluable workshop the following day, Saturday, May 17, designed specifically to assist historic home owners in analyzing their own preservation needs and discover renovation and repair techniques to preserve their investment. "It is possible to save the character of older homes and still respect a homeowner's limited time and budget." assures Leeke in a recent interview. This workshop is your opportunity to ask Leeke questions and get objective answers to all your vexing old-house problems. The workshop will include a demonstration of traditional and modern high-tech window repair methods. Leeke is a regular presenter at local and national preservation events. The fee for the one-day workshop is $25, and will be held at the Gilpin County Historical Society's Schoolhouse Museum in Central City beginning at 9:00 a.m.

For more information on the Honor Awards nominations, reception or Saturday preservation workshop, phone Roxanne Eflin at City Hall in Central City, (303) 582-5251, ext. 201.

Restoration '97 Conference
Atlanta, April 18-20, 1997

This four day event includes technical training, commercial exhibits and a conference of over forty technical conference sessions. Two of these sessions will be presented by John Leeke, Preservation Consultant:

Wood Columns

Classically-styled wood columns have become symbols of the stately grace surrounding many Southern plantation mansions. Even more modest porch pillars add to the architectural character of many homes -- until they begin to rot and crumble. Learn how to assess the condition of your columns and porch. Deteriorated columns can often be repaired at lower cost than replacement. When new columns are necessary proper installation leads to low maintenance costs and a long life. The basics will be covered for homeowners. Tradespeople and contractors will learn specific details on the latest methods, procedures, materials and techniques. 4/19/97 9:00am to 10:30am

Wood Windows

Preserving and repairing wood windows can be more economical than complete replacement. This especially true when the historic character and value of original windows is considered. The decision is often made to replace the entire window (frame, sash and all) when only minor repairs and routine maintenance are needed. Learn several effective repair and maintenance methods for sash, sills and frames including specific procedures, materials and techniques. 4/18/97 10:15am to 11:45am

Admission to the conference ranges from $100. to $200. For more information call 508 664-8066 or fax 508 664-5822.

Preservation Philosophy for People who Maintain Old Buildings
New Orleans, April 21-25, 1997

The Historical context of a historic site is the most important basis for resolving maintenance and repair dilemmas. This workshop will help caretakers, maintenance personnel, property managers, and proprietors of "handyman" businesses to make typical judgment calls on the job: repair or replace, preservation, restoration, or rehabilitation; and setting priorities with modest budgets. Workshop topics include the following: balancing the goals of buildings, landscapes, and collections maintenance; a review of the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation as they relate to routine maintenance; communications skills between supervisors and workers, clients, and preservation consultants; architectural history in the context of how technology shaped building construction practice; and building diagnostics and some of the tools that can be used in the field.

 

Instructors: John Leeke, Preservation Consultant with Stephen Spaulding or Lisa Sasser, National Park Service. Cost: $275. For more information call The Preservation Institute at 802 674-6752 or fax 802 674-6179.

Wood Porch Rehab
Providence, Rhode Island, March 2, 1997

Learn how to repair and save existing porch details with a wide range of traditional woodworking, modern carpentry practice and high-tech methods. This approach depends on craft knowledge and skill rather than the purchase and installation of standard products. Although it is labor intensive the bottom line can be much less costly than major porch rebuilding with all new materials. A fundamental understanding of wood characteristics and deterioration results in long-term low-maintenance performance. A continuing maintenance approach aids marketing by providing regular work in future years.

Presented at the The construction Business & Technology Conference. Participants say:


John Leeke's Historic HomeWorks

    207 773-2306      26 Higgins St. Portland, ME  04103

[Home][Library][Restoration Reports][Seminars][Forum][Internships][Office][Workshop][Front Porch][Search] info.© 1994-2015 JohnC.Leeke