John Wilcox Reports Progress
Post new topic   Reply to topic
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Windows Workshop  
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3005
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 6:10 am    Post subject: John Wilcox Reports Progress Reply with quote

John Wilcox writes:

John,

Thought you might be interested in what I have done with the skills I learned at the workshop. After talking to my painter about window restoration, I'm contemplating launching a small business, as there is a lot of this kind of work and no one that can do it.

I decided to take a chance on the Allback linseed putty. It is even more of mess here in hot and humid VA. But I am happy so far. My painter was impressed with my glazing skill, I just smiled like a pro. I owe it to
your glazing technique. The Allback putty advertises the ability to
immediately paint, but I recommend waiting a day or two, and using a very flexible brush when you do. The putty is very fluid even after a day or two and a stiff/short bristled brush will dig brush strokes in the putty, no kidding even after a day or two. It may be just the heat and humidity down south. I painted it with Allback linseed paint which smells as great as the putty (no solvents, so it is okay to smell intentionally), but again takes a long time to dry. However, it is nice to know that the paint and putty are totally compatible. Unfortunately, Allback paint is about 4 times as expensive as a normal, high quality paint.
They claim it covers 2 times as much as normal paint, but $30 a quart +
shipping is pretty expensive. I only use it on sashes and have found a
local oil based (linseed w/ solvent) paint to match the antique white.

I've got to go. I'm working on window number two. Once I get my processes more efficient, I'm thinking about launching Wilcox Window Restoration, Inc.

Take Care

John Wilcox



WilcoxDSC01271.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  37.01 KB
 Viewed:  1101 Time(s)

WilcoxDSC01271.jpg



WilcoxDSC01270.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  46.19 KB
 Viewed:  1128 Time(s)

WilcoxDSC01270.jpg



_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3005
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John:

It's good to see you're putting your new knowledge and skills to good use.

Quote:
> I decided to take a chance on the Allback linseed putty.


I've been using it on some sash here in my shop too.


Quote:
> The Allback putty advertises the ability to
> immediately paint, but I recommend waiting a day or two, and using a very
> flexible brush when you do. The putty is very fluid even after a day or two
> and a stiff/short bristled brush will dig brush strokes in the putty, no
> kidding even after a day or two.


I agree with you here, definitely a soft brush. The brushes sold along with the Allback paints are too stiff for me. I've found the soft brush and light touch needed and can paint right after glazing. I think that if you work on it you will be able to paint right after glazing too. I'd say you could get it after painting about 10 sash. On the technical side, you might try keeping the putty cooler, say in the refrigerator, which may improve handling. Or, don't use your bare hands to apply it--spread some out on a board and use the putty knife to take it directly from the board to the sash. Also, glazing and painting in an air conditioned space could help, and may increase your rate of production just because it is more comfortable.

Quote:

> It may be just the heat and humidity down
> south.

In this regard, did you find any mildew growing on the Allback putty? In the humid south, some of the other linseed oil putties are known to mildew right in the can, or on the sash before painting. Have you see this mildew with other putties? Do you see it with Allback putty? Could you run a little test by spreading some Allback putty out on a board and stick in in an area that is damp and dark, to see if any mildew will grow on it?


Quote:
> I painted it with Allback linseed paint which smells as great as the
> putty


Just don't put it on your sandwich instead of peanut butter!

Quote:
> Unfortunately,
> Allback paint is about 4 times as expensive as a normal, high quality paint.
> They claim it covers 2 times as much as normal paint, but $30 a quart +
> shipping is pretty expensive.


Yes, Allback paint is more costly, but you get more for your money. With the Allback putty/paint system they is no "waste" of solvent--100% of what you pay for and apply remains on the surface. With ordinary paint part of the "vehicle" that carries the paint to the surface is solvent or water that evaporates out of the paint film as it dries. Depending on the specific paint product that might be 20-40%, leaving only 80-60% on the surface after drying. So, if you want to do a true comparison of paint costs you must increase the cost of the paint by the the amount that evaporates out. Of course that doesn't make up for all of the 400% higher cost of Allback, but it does make Allback a little more "worth" it. Of much greater significance with Allback paint is not having to wait to paint means many dollars save in the labor of storage and handling, if you are doing glazing as business. Plus, the cost of the environmental damage done by ordinary solvent/petrochemical paint materials is seldom calculated, but also makes the Allback paint "worth" more. Behind all of this is the reality that the cost of paint in window work is less than 1% of the total cost. So, let's say the cost of completely refurbishing a sash is $100. Then the paint cost is going to be less than $1. Now, with ordinary oil-based solvent paint the cost might be $.20, and Allback paint costs 4 times that, or $.80. The labor for handling and storing a sash while the putty dries is going to be at least .1 hour(that one tenth of an hour, or 6 minutes) X at least $35/hr = $3.50, plus the cost of the storage space. You see? In the whole scheme, we're talking about $.60 more for paint that is saving far more than that in labor. So, you spend $.60 more on paint to save at least $3.50 in labor. This is the "business" point of view, rather than the "consumer" point of view, that only sees the price tag on the can.

Quote:
> Once I get my processes
> more efficient, I'm thinking about launching Wilcox Window Restoration, Inc.


As I said at the workshop, for your first 3-5 windows work on developing your skills and refining your step-by-step procedure. On sashes 5-10, keep track of your time, so you can use that information to make accurace estimate of labor and costs.

Keep us posted on all your progress.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Windows Workshop  
Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum