Ideal wood for fence?
Post new topic   Reply to topic
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Garden & Landscape  
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
TDL



Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Posts: 254

PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2009 9:41 pm    Post subject: Ideal wood for fence? Reply with quote

What is the most ideal wood for wood fencing? I see a lot of treated and ceder. Is there a preference between these two main stream options?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3004
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My exterior woodwork details report has a section on selecting wood.


http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/reports/reports.htm#Woodwork

and my Q&A column at the library has an item on wood fencing:
http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/qa/qa03.htm

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3004
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Selecting decay resistant wood is important.

When I was a kid growing up in Nebraska during the 1950s & 60s we were reusing fence posts that had been in the ground since 1900 and 1910. They were Locust and Osage. When we needed more posts we just took the pickup over and cut more posts out of the Locust and Osage Orange trees growing in the nearby windbreaks. I've recently been back home and all those posts, reused and new-made are still holding up, both out on the range and in around the corals. Occasionally we came across a Locust or Osage that was big enough and we sawed it into planks for thresholds and ramps around the stables, barns and sheds. Walnut logs that were too cranky for cabinet and furniture wood were sawn into boards for cribs, mangers and fencing. All that wood has been out the weather for half a century and is still holding up.

My dad would say, "we're only interested in doing this once," but you can bet that one time got our full attention and effort.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Don Wagstaff



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 101

PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 1:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is all split sweet chestnut. Couldn't be easier. Get some wood, maybe even milled planks (fairly straight in grain), split out the pickets and trim them down a bit with a good axe or a scrub plane and attach them to the posts in the ground.


Or do something similar with western red cedar.



DSCF2045.JPG
 Description:
 Filesize:  2.29 MB
 Viewed:  420 Time(s)

DSCF2045.JPG


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Adair55



Joined: 05 Sep 2013
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pressure-treated pine gets its durability and moisture resistance not from Mother Nature, but through chemical treatments and physical processes performed by people.
_________________
Primark news
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elance
http://www.facebook.com/Elance
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Historic HomeWorks Forum Forum Index -> Garden & Landscape  
Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum