Barn Paint Project (with Video)
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2999
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 9:42 pm    Post subject: Barn Paint Project (with Video) Reply with quote

My wife and I are completely stripping our 1899 barn and repainting. We do a 10' wide section from foundation to eaves complete before moving on the the next section. We get one or two, sometimes three sections done each year. Three sides are done, one more to go.

We are using steam paint removal (lead-safe work method, will not burn down the barn), then wet abrasive scrub for surface preparation (also a lead-safe method), let it dry out, then woodwork repairs, oil pre-treatment, slow-dry linseed oil primer, two top coats of 100% acrylic house paint.

We follow a complete and exacting lead-safe program that effectively controls the lead-health risks and prevents lead-contamination of our property, neighborhood and the greater environment. While you will see some of our lead-safe work methods, there is much more to the program than you see in the videos.

The basic procedure for the work is:

1. Setup: access with ladders & scaffolding, lead-safe containments, weather protection from sun and rain

2. Steam Paint Removal: soften paint with steam, scrape off paint, clean out all joints between wood parts, lead-safe cleanup after each work session, all paint removed down to bare wood

3. Wet Abrasive Scrub

4. Woodwork Repairs: wood dutchmen, individual part replacement, wood-epoxy repairs, flashing, re-nailing clapboards

5. Pre-treatment, all surfaces, right over the woodwork repair areas

6. Prime: oil-based alkyd resin slow dry primer, hand brushing, let dry, sand off any whiskers or nibs

7. Sealants: one-part urethane high performance sealant (Soneborn NP1) if needed, at "weathering" joints, not between clapboards

8. Paint: 100% acrylic waterborne house paint (or oil-based linseed oil & alkyd resin house paint), two top-coats of paint, spot sand after first coat to remove any whiskers or nibs

9. Breakdown: take down scaffolding, final cleanup

During the summer of 2009 we did 20+ live broadcasts of the work. Here you can watch 'real time' recordings of every work session. 'Real time' means that it is not edited for your entertainment pleasure. These are recordings of entire work sessions, up to 2 or 4 hours long. It shows exactly what it is like to work for hours upon hours; this is the real work of this world with real benefits (like a paint job that will last 15 to 25 years).

1. Setup

iframe width="320" height="240"

Barn Paint & Wood, pump-jack scaffold setup, 1

(0:14:00, 619 views, 3 live)

Barn Paint & Wood, pump jack scaffold setup, 2

(1:55:18, 8 June 2009, 563 views, 1 live)

Barn Paint & Wood, shade setup, lead-safe ground containment setup

(1:14:42, 13 June 2009, 117 views, 4 live)


2. Steam Paint Removal

Barn, Steam Paint Removal 3

(19:51, 20 June 2009, 48 views, 5 live)
Phyllis talks about the project and steam paint removal.

3. Wet Abrasive Scrub
We often use the wet abrasive scrub method to clean and prepare old paint and wood surfaces for painting.


Video: 3 minutes.

More details on Wet Abrasive Scrub:
http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1751

4. Woodwork Repairs


Barn, woodwork, remove bed moulding from cornice

(21:43, 16 June 2009, 78 views ,3 live)


Repairing Split Clapboard and filling nail holes:

click > to begin play, then hover your cursor over the grey line just below the image and click on a time to find these interesting segments:
00:20 intro of the three repairs
01:25 placing the epoxy consolidant
04:45 placing the epoxy past filler
18:45 extends the life of a paint job out to 20-25 years
24:00 & 28:35 a time trial and unit costing for filling nail holes with epoxy (6 holes per minute, or .17 minutes per hole, direct labor; I would make that .3 minutes per hole for estimating to include cleaning out the holes and a little time for mixing the epoxy, which were not shown in the video)

Repairing Split Clapboard:


5. Pre-Treatment
Pre-treatment is applying a solution to the surface of the wood that penetrates into the wood. It contains materials that protect the wood from deterioration and prepare the wood surface so the primer to come will perform better.
Pre-Treatment Details:
http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=6257#6257

(more to come)

6. Prime

(more to come)

7. Sealants

(more to come)

8. Top Coats

(more to come)

Learn more about paint methods by asking here, or come to my 3-day Wood & Paint workshop n Portland, Maine, usually scheduled in August. Let me know if you would like to have this workshop in your town or neighborhood.

Click "post reply" to leave comments and questions.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought


Last edited by johnleeke on Mon Jul 08, 2019 10:16 am; edited 37 times in total
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Don Wagstaff



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 101

PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2010 2:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barn covered in a mix of Swedish pine tar and home grown and pressed linseed oil and lamp black pigment...

http://www.archive.org/details/PaintBarn
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johnleeke
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2999
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2010 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don:

Welcome to the forum.

Your old-fashioned barn work is very pleasing to see. We have done some similarly old-fashioned work here, but now we adapt to using more recent methods and materials. (Though my heart aches to do the old-fashioned like you.) Here in the USA there is a lot of commercial pressure to tear down old buildings like this and throw up new ones made of plastic and cardboard. So, we are very old-fashioned in saving our old barn, even though we use some recent methods, recent compared to yours.

John
the woodworker
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Don Wagstaff



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 101

PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2010 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

I thought I had registered some time ago - but I guess not.

Yes, a lot of folks are seeing what I do as old fashioned, as you put it and maybe it is so. For me it stems from a sort of personal economy which is something like, if I want something, can I make it or do it myself - that covers about 90% of it, if not then I ask do I know someone who can make it or do it. Then I ask does someone exist who can reasonably make it or do it for me. If not then I ponder whether or not there might be any locally owned and operated, (preferably small scale), merchants who might facilitate my wishes. If I am still unresolved I reconsider whether or not I really cannot make it myself - this tar/linseed oil is something of an example. And last I will resort to a commonly commercial avenue, with what you call big box stores excepted, I don't ever consider these as an alternative. I am also sceptical of highly enginered and overly contrived - and promoted - products and preffer to turn to my "Henley's 20th Century Boof of Recipes, Formulas and Processes".

You know, some people here in the village wanted to knock this place down. Either that or disassemble it and move it to the national open air museum, and a lot of other mumbo-jumbo in between. How do you account for that range of considerations?
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2999
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

See the Pre-Treatment discussion here:

http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=6257#6257

I started developing these pre-treatment methods back in the 1980s,
based on studies at the Forest Products Laboratory and my own experience.

If the paint is lifting off down to bare wood the main cause is
excessive moisture in the wood. The source of the moisture may be from
inside the house, or from rain water seeping in through joints in the
woodwork, or through cracks in the paint film.

Extreme Prep:
If the existing paint film is thicker than .015" (a dime is .023"
thick), then it is thick enough that the water vapor cannot easily
escape from the wood directly through the paint film, so it simply
pushes the paint film off the wood on its way out. When we want to get
the maximum durability of the new paint coating we remove all the
existing paint down to bare wood. We also clean the wood with a Wet
Abrasive Scrub:

http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1751

Durability:
With the combination of 1. Removal of heavy paint buildup, 2. Wet
Abrasive Scrub, and 3. Pre-Treatment, plus experienced and skilled
workers we have been able to get 20 to 30 years of life out of a paint
job. With an extreme salt water micro-climate that drops down to 15 to
20 years.

Sealing the Wood:
>>It seems to me that sealing the wood would reduce the opportunity for
the primer to soak into he wood for more "bite."<<

An effective pre-treatment should not seal the wood. It should leave
most of the wood cells at the surface open so the primer can still make
a mechanical bond by soaking into the cells. About 40% of the bonding is
mechanical and 60% of the bonding is chemical. The pre-treatment
improved chemical bonding by making the highly variable surface
conditions of old wood more consistent and suitable for better
performance of the primer.

_________________
John

by hammer and hand great works do stand
by pen and thought best words are wrought
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