Painting my front porch
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Prairie Homeowner



Joined: 22 Dec 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 5:39 pm    Post subject: Painting my front porch Reply with quote

I'm prepping my 100 year old front porch to re-paint it. I'm going to use a "porch and deck" paint, and the guy at the paint store (hardware store) said I don't need to prime before I paint.

I've taken the porch down to mostly bare wood and it doesn't make sense to me that I don't need to prime. Can you help clarify?

Thanks

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rncx



Joined: 21 Jun 2008
Posts: 660
Location: Little Rock, AR

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 2:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

he's wrong, if what you're planning on using is in fact a paint.

if it's some sort of stain, the primer isn't required.

what store, got a link to what you plan to use?
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Kate



Joined: 07 Mar 2007
Posts: 32
Location: Vermont

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are some urethane based enamels that don't require a primer when used on wood.

I've used Pittsburgh's "Exterior/Interior Floor & Deck Urethane Modified Enamel" on a well cover with pretty good results. I have to repaint it every 5 years or so. The well cover is covered with snow 5-6 months/year, so I wouldn't imagine anything holding up much longer than that.

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sswiat



Joined: 01 Sep 2004
Posts: 231
Location: Cambria, New York

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would recommend following the manufacturers recommendations on any product used. If in question, the internet and some calls to the right folks at the manufacturers works well. By following the manufacturers instructions you will have a better chance if the paint fails prematurely and a claim is made against them.

I give most paint store people 50% credibility on anything they tell me. Occasionally you can find a person with knowledge but it seems like most "paint stores of old" are disappearing and the newer ones have sales associates who probably never painted a brush stroke in their life.
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JLee



Joined: 06 Nov 2006
Posts: 79

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought I'd add my question here rather than posting a new topic:

I too have been told not to prime my old porch (partially scraped bare, partially old paint, all rough sanded). What they seem to be saying is that they don't make an oil primer "rated" for walking on. After calling several different SW stores I'm being told to either use the acrylic porch and floor enamel with no primer or SW industrial oil enamel with no primer, thinning the first coat with 10% mineral spirits. The traditionalist in me says stick with oil, especially since everything I've ever heard says acrylics need a primer over existing oil. I'd love some opinions here, I really don't trust the paint stores, it seems like they have to tell me something even if they have nothing truly compatible.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2999
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2015 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Industrial oil enamel with the first coat with 10% mineral spirits sounds good to me. I might even bump that up to 20%. This would help it penetrate into the surface of the bare wood, and any tiny nooks and crannies in the other surfaces. Give that first coat plenty of time for the mineral spirits to evaporate, before additional coats.

Keep us posted on your experience.

By the way, how are your shellacked sashes holding up? I found that mine need renewed shellac about every five years, due to sun and moisture deterioration.

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JLee



Joined: 06 Nov 2006
Posts: 79

PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2015 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I ended up finding alkyd porch and floor enamel from Ben Moore.
I may not have that option when its time to repaint.

Yes, my shellac is wearing a bit from the UV. on my list of things to do!

Would top coating with waterlox or similar prevent this?
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