Pre-Treatment, before priming exerior wood
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2015 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the Forum!

Just go ahead and apply the pre-treatment over the old paint film too, the pre-treatment will soak into any cracks in the old paint film and tend to seal them up--a good thing. Then wipe the pre-treatment off the painted areas while it is still wet. A bit of the pre-treatment may still remain on the surface, but it will dry and you should be good to go.

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bjwhite



Joined: 21 Aug 2013
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Location: Yarmouth, ME

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you. That makes my work much easier.
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shaftmaster



Joined: 20 Apr 2015
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Location: Denver

PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm hoping to get some clarification on using pre-treatments (e.g. flood penetrol and turpentine) on sashes that have various types of repairs such as wood consolidants (e.g. abatron liquid wood) and epoxy repairs.

From what I've read here, repairs are made before the pre-treatments are applied. When applying the pre-treatment, whould I avoid areas where consolidants and/or epoxies have been used or is it ok to apply the pre-treatments to the repaired areas?

Also, would it be ok to apply a pre-treatment before using consolidants or epoxies? For example, I have several windows sills that have old paint that is peeling off, but it will be some time before I can restore all of them. Is it possible to scrape off the loose paint and apply some type of pre-treatment now to prevent further water damage and then make repairs and finish the restoration later?

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Paul
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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul,

It is OK to apply the Consolidating oil-resin type of pre-treatment over fully complete wood-epoxy repairs. After spreading the pre-treatment over the surrounding wood and wood-epoxy repair area, simply wipe any pretreatment off the epoxy materials. If a slight amount of the pre-treatment remains on the epoxy it will dry and not be a problem.

Do not apply any type of penetrating pre-treatment before wood-epoxy repairs. The treatment would prevent epoxy consolidants or primers from penetrating into the wood. Penetration is usually an important part of wood-epoxy repairs.

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shaftmaster



Joined: 20 Apr 2015
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Location: Denver

PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

johnleeke wrote:

Do not apply any type of penetrating pre-treatment before wood-epoxy repairs. The treatment would prevent epoxy consolidants or primers from penetrating into the wood. Penetration is usually an important part of wood-epoxy repairs.


Thanks for the response.

Is there any type of waterproofing I could apply to the exposed wood that wouldn't affect epoxy penetration, or should I just cover it with some plastic drop cloth material and not risk having problems later?

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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2015 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you cover the sill with plastic sheeting, be sure to do it in a way that allows some air to move between the plastic and the sill, so the plastic does not trap water in the sill. See page 26 of Save America's Windows
http://saveamericaswindows.com/get-the-book/

If your wood-epoxy repairs will be highly localized (such as near the sill-jamb oint", then see this video that shows how to temporarily cover a decay pocket and paint the rest of the sill:
http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1837

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BenS



Joined: 08 May 2018
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Location: Victoria, British Columbia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 3:29 pm    Post subject: Maximum wait time between pre-treatment, priming Reply with quote

I have some severely weathered douglas fir exterior trim that I am repainting.

I plan to use the scrape, wet abrasive, COR pre-treatment, prime, and paint method described above, with a linseed oil glazing putty as weather check filler. I will be using Benjamin Moore penetrating (slow oil) primer and a BM waterborne latex paint over top.

I anticipate that despite all efforts to get the work done I may be delayed between stages by several days or a week. It was stated that the pre-treatment should not fully cure before priming. BM staff (from the local paint store, not technicians) have told me that the ideal time to paint over the penetrating primer is between 3 - 7 days.

Is there therefore an ideal stage to leave the project for a few days/week? Or will that cause severe enough problems that I should work on small areas of my trim, getting them completely painted, before moving on to new areas?

I am thinking that it is more important to move quickly from pre-treatment to priming than from priming to painting. But please enlighten me.
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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good time for a break would be after priming, but don't let the break drift into more than a couple of weeks, unless the work is protected from rain and sun, which can damage the surface of the primer, possibly requiring re-priming.
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