Fantastic dulux weathershield paint
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Bikergonebald



Joined: 25 Apr 2021
Posts: 2
Location: Worcestershire, UK

PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2021 11:47 am    Post subject: Fantastic dulux weathershield paint Reply with quote

Hi all,
I have a 17th century half timber house with brick infill. While the oldest part is 17th century the house has been changed a lot of the years which is probably why a previous owner painted the front of the house.
The current top layer is Dulux weathershield and it is now flaking in areas, detached and hollow behind in other places. It’s also now looking dirty and needs something done with it.

I know the wall needs to breathe to keep it dry so I’ve tried using a gas torch and scraper on an area of garden wall. With this method it will take years.

What options or suggestions are there for stripping the paint?
Do I need to get it all off or is it ok to just get it off the lime mortar joints?
If I am going to paint it again after what products should I be trying that are breathable and won’t cause further damage?

I would consider getting the professionals in when I know how it should be done.

Thanks
Kevin



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Owner of a 17th Century half timber oak framed farm house with various later conversions of animal barns to accommodation.
Last renovated in the 1970’s :-(
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3000
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2021 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can you post a few close up photos of the paint conditions?
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Bikergonebald



Joined: 25 Apr 2021
Posts: 2
Location: Worcestershire, UK

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2021 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi John,

I'm adding some photos here. You can see how the mortar lines are expanding out, this i believe is because the damp coming up through the wall can't evaporate out of the soft bricks because of the paint and therefore damages the lime mortar, which in many areas also has cement mortar over the top.

In addition cracks and flaking paint are letting water in and making the problem worse.

The final photo is where we've used a gas torch and scraper to remove it from the old wall away from the house, it now needs re-pointing with lime.



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Owner of a 17th Century half timber oak framed farm house with various later conversions of animal barns to accommodation.
Last renovated in the 1970’s :-(
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3000
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2021 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your strategy of removing the paint from the face of the bricks and mortar, and repointing is probably good. Remove what paint you can from the face of the bricks, repoint with lime mortar, then don't repaint for a few or several years while the remaining paint fails and falls off. I could be that your masonry should not be paint, or it could be that it should be painted. I don't know.
I am in the USA and there are undoubtedly others in the UK who know best how to deal with your local masonry, weather, etc.
Finding a local pro who knows historic buildings and your specific materials and conditions should be your goal. This may be difficult because some "pros" will just want to sell you products and services that may not serve the needs of your fine old home.

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by hammer and hand great works do stand
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TideWater



Joined: 03 Aug 2014
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2021 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you tried contacting the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings in the UK? https://www.spab.org.uk/ They must have tons of experience with this type of construction.
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