Turning heat back on in winter?
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Highland



Joined: 26 Nov 2010
Posts: 6
Location: IOWA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 12:50 pm    Post subject: Turning heat back on in winter? Reply with quote

I will be closing on my house this week. The heat has been off this winter and it has been very cold for the last mouth (-0) Im worried about the plaster walls cracking. I wanted to close on this house fast, so I could keep the heat on, but it was a VA forclosure and is taking alot more time than we thought, and they wouldnt keep the heat on.

I want to start working on the house this winter so we can move in by next fall. I need to redo the two bathrooms and the kitchen. Will turning the heat back on do more damage to the plaster? Or should I keep the heat off till spring and let the house warm back up naturally?? I dont want to do any damage to the walls. They seemed to be in pretty good shape when we last looked at the house. Any other way to heat the house back up slowly? It has ratiant heat, and I know the water gets around 180*, Will this cause my walls to crack around by the radiators??

Thanks - Ron
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3009
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ron:

If the house has only been unheated this winter, you (and the house) are probably not in to bad a shape.

Bring the house up to regular temps slowly. The longer you draw it out the better, but I say over few weeks may do it, unless you have some unusual high-moisture problems.

Set up a strategy for bringing the heat up with your heating system specialist. Usually, they will want to check for frost-burst pipes and radiators, get the boiler going and keep it going, with the water circulating and the spaces where the pipes run at about 40 degrees, to keep them from freezing. (unless you have anti-freeze coolant in the system)

Just set a schedule of increasing heat, such as turning the heat on for an hour in in the morning and an hour the end of the afternoon for the first week, 2 hours morning and afternoon the second week, etc. Keep a weather eye out for cold snaps when you may have bump the heat way up before the cold snap arrives.

Before you start heating, and as you first heat the place up, have a plumber inspect the domestic water system for frozen water pipes. Sometimes this includes shutting off the domestic water and checking out the domestic water pipes by air pressure so you don't end up with thawing pipes leaking through a frost-burst pipe causing water damage.

Good luck, keep us posted.

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John

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Highland



Joined: 26 Nov 2010
Posts: 6
Location: IOWA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All water was drained from heating system and all water lines. I have to get the plumber back in to get things up and running. He had to cut some water lines because there was traped water in them. I dont think the realtor thought the house was gonna sell till next spring.

A friend of mine said to put space heaters in all the lower rooms and let them run for a while, till the house got up around 40*???
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