Paint on Brick
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SashGuy



Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 152
Location: Houston

PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 1:33 pm    Post subject: Paint on Brick Reply with quote

I've just purchased a 1936 Tract Home that I will be taking back to period, but it has extensive areas where the previous owner had splattered white latex onto the brick, then coated it with brick colored paint in order to cover his mistakes. The paint has faded to pink now, so needs to go. So far, I've tried water blasting, heat gun and steam with no luck.

I've been reading up on Soda Blasting, and from what I've read and seen on You-Tube, this appears to be the preferred method.

I've located a 14# Soda Blasting set-up at Harbor Freight for under $100, but prefer to get some input from the Forum before I go that direction.

Any experience?



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Ken Chester



Joined: 06 Feb 2012
Posts: 2
Location: NH

PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Paint on Brick Reply with quote

SashGuy wrote:
I've just purchased a 1936 Tract Home that I will be taking back to period, but it has extensive areas where the previous owner had splattered white latex onto the brick, then coated it with brick colored paint in order to cover his mistakes. The paint has faded to pink now, so needs to go. So far, I've tried water blasting, heat gun and steam with no luck.

I've been reading up on Soda Blasting, and from what I've read and seen on You-Tube, this appears to be the preferred method.

I've located a 14# Soda Blasting set-up at Harbor Freight for under $100, but prefer to get some input from the Forum before I go that direction.

Any experience?

Hi, Many years ago I learned to clean brick using Crystal Drano and hot water. I had an old colonial with three layers of paint on the brick fireplace. The trick was to get heavy duty black rubber gloves for use with paint stripper, old clothes, goggles, moving air or a resperator. The trick is to paint on the mixture of hot water and lye on the brick with a brush. Then scrub with a natural bristle floor brush. The paint came off in one application. Lye and hot water mixed get very agitated when mixed together, so add the lye slowly. You don't need much water, lean towards using less water. I used this to strip paint on a floor as well, but went back to 5F5 as I liked the results better. Don't forget the gloves, as your fingernails will turn black if lye gets on them. This was the warning from the antiques dealer that told me the trick.
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Ken Chester



Joined: 06 Feb 2012
Posts: 2
Location: NH

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:11 am    Post subject: Re: Paint on Brick Reply with quote

Ken Chester wrote:
SashGuy wrote:
I've just purchased a 1936 Tract Home that I will be taking back to period, but it has extensive areas where the previous owner had splattered white latex onto the brick, then coated it with brick colored paint in order to cover his mistakes. The paint has faded to pink now, so needs to go. So far, I've tried water blasting, heat gun and steam with no luck.

I've been reading up on Soda Blasting, and from what I've read and seen on You-Tube, this appears to be the preferred method.

I've located a 14# Soda Blasting set-up at Harbor Freight for under $100, but prefer to get some input from the Forum before I go that direction.

Any experience?

Hi, Many years ago I learned to clean brick using Crystal Drano and hot water. I had an old colonial with three layers of paint on the brick fireplace. The trick was to get heavy duty black rubber gloves for use with paint stripper, old clothes, goggles, moving air or a resperator. The trick is to paint on the mixture of hot water and lye on the brick with a brush. Then scrub with a natural bristle floor brush. The paint came off in one application. Lye and hot water mixed get very agitated when mixed together, so add the lye slowly. You don't need much water, lean towards using less water. I used this to strip paint on a floor as well, but went back to 5F5 as I liked the results better. Don't forget the gloves, as your fingernails will turn black if lye gets on them. This was the warning from the antiques dealer that told me the trick.



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