Column base settling
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SashGuy



Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 152
Location: Houston

PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:08 pm    Post subject: Column base settling Reply with quote

Does anyone have a quick and easy method for straightening this out?


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jbmnd93



Joined: 15 Jul 2010
Posts: 54

PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2012 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's the other column doing? Bowing out, in or is it plumb?
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2012 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hard to tell what's going on here with just one photo to look at.

Similar situations I have dealt with have always started with an investigation to determine what is causing the mis-allignment. Then correcting the damage, taking care of the cause, etc.

Since it probably involves structural issues it probably will not be quick and easy.

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SashGuy



Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 152
Location: Houston

PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is going on here is the left side of the footing has washed out causing the brick to lean out at 6 degrees. This has pulled the column out to the side and the porch ceiling has a slight declination. The other side is perfect. Thought is to jack pole the ceiling, dig down under the low side, jack it back to level, re-bar around the jack and fill with concrete. Plan B is to take it out and rebuild it. Any experience with this?
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johnleeke
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2012 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like a plan.

If plan A fails it would probably be due to the mass of brick masonry cracking or falling apart. In that case most or all of the bricks and cap stones could be salvaged to implement plan B.

So, tipping the mass of masonry back into vertical is the trick. More than one jack along the lower outer edge of the mass might spread the load reducing the chance for cracking. If the lower edge of the mass is even enough you might get a big angle iron along it to spread the load even better. An angle iron something like 1/2" thick by 4" or 6". Set the angle iron onto the masonry in a bed of cement mortar, and let the mortar cure well before the jacking--this would spread the load even better, especially with 3 or more jacks. Then leave the angle iron in place when you cast the new footing.

I suggest having an engineer review your plan before starting. Usually I can find an engineer who will do a "spot review" and just charge for a hour or two of time. Sometimes they have a 4 hour or 1 day minimum. I usually don't ask the engineer for a "stamp of approval", just for a review of intended methods and recommendations for improvements to the method.

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SashGuy



Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 152
Location: Houston

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2012 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like the angle iron with the mortar bed a lot. In fact, I'll take the concept a expand on it. If I drive a fore and aft angle, double the column width, to cradle the face angle, I can half the jack load and double the footing area. Thanks.


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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2012 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot depends on what you find underneath there during excavation.
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SashGuy



Joined: 10 Sep 2010
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Location: Houston

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2012 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You mean like Jimmy Hoffa? (G)
Yep, I do plan to have to chip away quite a bit of jagged slag.
If this weren't a 1918 in near original state, I would advise the customer to pull it out and start over.
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