refinishing 1913 douglas fir in a bathroom.
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BlakeAronson



Joined: 14 Jul 2009
Posts: 48
Location: Long Beach, CA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 9:53 am    Post subject: refinishing 1913 douglas fir in a bathroom. Reply with quote

I am getting ready to remodel a bathroom in my 1913 craftsman. Was leaning towards some vintage looking penny tile but the original douglas fir floors are still there so I've been debating sticking with wood. The same flooring was refinished elsewhere in the house and turned out great. The bathroom has had many layers of vinyl flooring installed so the flooring has been covered for probably most of it's life, I have carefully removed it in a few areas around the tub to inspect and have not found any damage yet, of course I wont know until it is all removed (and yes I know there is probably asbestos in the bottom layer or two, fortunately we're only talking about a 7x8' bathroom)

If I were to refinish the wood flooring, what would be the best type of finish to help protect against mouisture? Also note I am in CA so a lot of the better finishes aren't sold here anymore. The bathroom has two windows and a ventilation fan so it doesn't stay humid. I do realize that any water spills have to be wiped up promptly when it comes to wood flooring.

As anyone lived with a wood floor in an old house bathroom, would you recommend it or advise against it? I'm imagining this old growth wood would be more durable than anything new.

Thanks
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rncx



Joined: 21 Jun 2008
Posts: 660
Location: Little Rock, AR

PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2014 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wood is a lot more durable than people give it credit for, to be honest. Particularly old growth stuff.

If you think about it...no matter what finish you use, the joints and the bottoms of the wood will not be finished. They're going to take on moisture, and then release that moisture when they dry.

So the short answer is...don't worry about it, as long as you put something as a top coat that is not sensitive to water. Using bare shellac in a bathroom would not be wise due to its sensitivity to water, but even that would be ok with something else as a top coat.

After all, we all mop our wood floors from time to time don't we? Yet our houses do not fall down ;).

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