Heat Guns Start Fires in Historic Houses
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 2010 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Please be sure to let us know here if you find it.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 23, 2011 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another fire caused by heat gun paint removal, in Wheaton, IL:

http://triblocal.com/wheaton/2011/03/22/wheaton-home-fire-ruled-accidental-without-injuries/

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mimoore



Joined: 26 Apr 2011
Posts: 6
Location: Philadelphia

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2011 2:14 pm    Post subject: Infra red vs heat gun vs steam Reply with quote

I am new to the site, having looked around a bit today. Both a bit inspired and overwhelmed at the wealth of information. (BTW, I 've been working as I can for the last 10 years on our 110 year old Queen Ann).

Quite some time ago I learned of the concern over heat guns in starting fires (actually had it happen to an acquaintance), and have not used them unless I was certain there were no cracks, etc- that I could directly see what was being heated, or being very cautious about the risk of fire. (I did have a "smolder" start once in a readily accessible area that was immediately extinguished).

Since then I have used radiant heat, either from the quartz element of a space heater, from a 500 watt spotlight, or 250 watt heat lamp. These can certainly heat dry wood to the point of burning, but typically don't need to make it that hot and you're only heating what you can see. I appreciate the need for ventilation because of the possibility of vaporized lead.

I haven't seen steam used, that I can recall, before this site. I see some of the advantages, but from watching video it seems relatively slow compared to infra red.

Anybody with experience with both care to comment? Additionally, with the steam, can you still break glass from the heat, or do you not need to worry so much about that?

Thank you.
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mimoore



Joined: 26 Apr 2011
Posts: 6
Location: Philadelphia

PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2011 11:10 am    Post subject: Apologies/ F/U Reply with quote

Well, having spent more time looking through the forum and articles I see that John and others do have experience with infra red, and though not described explicitly (that I've found yet, anyway) your experience has led you to prefer steam.

Chemicals can be expensive and nasty, expecially older things based on Sodium hydroxide or methylene chloride, but there are newer products that are much more friendly to human nose and skin as well as the environment, and some brands are not as pricey as they once were.
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2011 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yet another fire, this one in Carthage, IL, started with a hot air gun removing paint. The church congregation forgives the paint crew and gives them permission to go back to work. Hopefully they will not be using the hot air gun.

Get the details here:
http://www.journalpilot.com/articles/2011/05/11/news/news1.txt

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johnleeke
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fire started by homeowner removing paint with a torch in Harleysville PA:

http://lansdale.patch.com/articles/homeowner-starts-fire-using-torch-to-remove-paint

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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 2999
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yet another, in Providence, Rhode Island:

http://news.providencejournal.com/breaking-news/2012/02/painters-heat-g.html

After interviewing the painters the fire chief rules the cause of the fire accidental. I wish I had a recording of the interviews.

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