Blood floors?
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CL C



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2005 10:37 pm    Post subject: Blood floors? Reply with quote

Hi,
We are interested in buying a historic property. In the description of the property it lists "blood floors" as one of the features.
The house was built, I believe, between 1920-30 and is in the Dallas area.
Anyone know what this is or what it refers to? Thank you for your help,
Camile


Last edited by CL C on Fri Jan 07, 2011 4:32 pm; edited 1 time in total
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sswiat



Joined: 01 Sep 2004
Posts: 231
Location: Cambria, New York

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2005 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Camille:

They may be referring to an exotic wood species known as bloodwood.

That would be my guess.


Bloodwood:
(Brosimum paraense)

Bloodwood is sometimes referred to as cardinal wood, for its obvious beautiful deep rose colour. With age it's colour does darken.
The wood is very dense, with a tight fine, mostly linear grain.


Steve Swiat
Northwood Restoration Shop
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CL C



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2005 8:47 pm    Post subject: Blood floors? Reply with quote

Thank you, Steve! Sounds like you know your stuff! I appreciate your help!
Thanks,
Camile
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johnleeke
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Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Posts: 3005
Location: Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I learned about "blood floors" on a recent work trip to southern Arizona. David Yubeta grew up in his grandma's adobe house that that had dirt floors. She was always complaining about the dusty floors. To seal and consolidate the floors they used the traditional method ofsprinkling ox blood on the floors, which dried and cured to give a leathery like surface that could be swept and cleaned, sort of, well--a lot better than bare dirt. One side effect is that it also attracted a lot of flies. A little later they poured a cement floor to keep down the flies. But, that had a bad consequence too when the bottoms of the adobe walls deteriorated due to the concrete trapping moisture in them.
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Noelle Pierce



Joined: 09 Sep 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I concur with John. Blood floors are a dirt and ox blood mix that creates a hard packed dirt kindof like clay or mud. the fact that the house is in the southwest makes me think that is what you are looking at.
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